Drama - annotated exemplars level 2 AS91217 (B)

Examine the work of a playwright (2.5B)

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TKI Drama Assessment Resources

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This annotated exemplar is intended for teacher use only. The student work shown does not always represent a complete sample of what is required. Selected extracts are used, focused on the grade boundaries, in order to assist assessors to make judgements at the national standard.

Low Excellence

CommentaryStudent response

For Excellence, the student needs to examine the work of a playwright showing a perceptive understanding.

This involves making insightful connections between the play and the wider world of the play and the playwright.

This student has clearly communicated an informed understanding of the concerns of the playwright in relation to the two texts used. Key ideas are explained clearly and supported with appropriate detail. The work moves beyond that to indicate instances of perceptive understanding.

The student uses an ‘in role’ dramatic approach as William Shakespeare (1) and discusses the stylistic conventions employed in Taming of the Shrew and Hamlet, and the justifications for their use.

The student begins to demonstrate some insight into the linguistic limitations Shakespeare was working within, and the effect of the English Renaissance on the English language when they describe Shakespeare’s tendency to create new words (2).

The student points out the implicit message against Regicide within Hamlet (3). This indicates that they are aware of the political realities for playwrights in the Elizabethan period, and are considering layers of meaning rather than explicit meaning.

The nature of love and marriage is explored and insightfully linked to the structure of Taming of the Shrew (4).

The student explores the conundrum of ‘Hamlet’ when Gertrude worries who actually upset the natural order (5). This shows that the student is considering Shakespeare’s concerns within his collected work as opposed to within each play.

To secure Excellence, the student could consider common thematic and structural features of both plays.

Student 1 (PDF, 90KB)

High Merit

CommentaryStudent response

For Merit, the student needs to examine the work of a playwright showing an informed understanding.

This involves giving detailed explanations and providing examples to illustrate statements. Examples are to be taken from the texts to articulate the playwright’s ideas in detail and with clarity.

The student uses an ‘in role’ dramatic approach as playwright William Shakespeare and characters Hamlet and Bianca (1). They explore a wide range of socio-historical issues in relation to The Taming of the Shrew and Hamlet, and offer useful descriptions of a range of stylistic and structural conventions (2). These are generally clearly explained in a detailed fashion and are supported with specific evidence and quotes.

There are several instances where the student explicitly examines the authorial intent in the use of conventions or concepts (3). The student speculates about the social message that ‘you cannot change your social class’ that is embodied in the use of Christopher Sly in The Taming of the Shrew (4). The student also suggests some insight into the nature of marriage as discussed in this play (5).

To reach Excellence, the student needs to further consider what is not just evident but is also implied. This would draw out the key themes and concerns of the playwright and support the insight required for ‘perceptive’ understanding. Similarly, the student might have explored the use of some of the other structural conventions used in terms of function or purpose. 

Student 2 (PDF, 88KB)

Low Merit

CommentaryStudent response

For Merit, the student needs to examine the work of a playwright showing an informed understanding.

This involves giving detailed explanations and providing examples to illustrate statements. Examples are to be taken from the texts to articulate the playwright’s ideas in detail and with clarity.

This student presents the evidence in role as William Shakespeare, as Hamlet from the play titled with the same name, and as Baptista from The Taming of the Shrew (1). The student explains stylistic considerations like the use of iambic pentameter, rhyming verse and prose with clarity and specific detail to inform understanding (2). 

Quotes are used to support the communication of ideas. The role of men and women within marriage is also explored with specific detail and clarity (3).

The student asserts that Hamlet cannot kill Claudius because ‘If he prays then he goes to heaven because he is automatically forgiven for being a king’ (4).

This implies that it is the role of King that allows Claudius entry to heaven rather than the prayer. While the student has shown an awareness of the role of religion in this instance, there is also some indication that they are aware of the notion of the Divine Right of Kings (4).

For a more secure Merit, the student could consider ‘the work’ of the playwright as opposed to individual plays, and consider what the examined texts show about Shakespeare’s concerns and how he dealt with them through his plays. 

Student 3 (PDF, 211KB)

High Achieved

CommentaryStudent response

For Achieved, the student needs to examine the work of a playwright.

This involves exploring the concerns of the playwright, and where and how they are expressed in their work.  It also involves exploring one or more of the following:

  • the social and/or historical world of the playwright as it relates to the chosen texts
  • the common and/or contrasting ideas and concerns evident in the plays
  • the style, structure and purpose of the plays.
  • the performance space and its influence on the plays.

Extracts from two or more texts must be examined.

Using an ‘in role’ dramatic approach (1), the student has explored the features of William Shakespeare’s plays The Taming of the Shrew and Hamlet in general terms.

The notion of open-air performance is alluded to (2) and classes/tiers of the audience (3). The student considers the perspectives of love and marriage that exist in the two plays. Hamlet’s perspective on romantic love is supported with an appropriate quote.

There is evidence of the student’s awareness of the Divine Right of Kings, the role of religion and the Wheel of Fortune as concerns that would have influenced the playwright (5).

To reach Merit, the student could examine the ‘play within a play’ device and the effect on the audience. The student needs to consider what influences (or concerns) might be, why they have influenced the writer and how the dramatic works reflect that influence. This needs to be supported with evidence drawn from the texts to verify an informed understanding.

Student 4 (PDF, 85KB)

Low Achieved

CommentaryStudent response

For Achieved, the student needs to examine the work of a playwright.

This involves exploring the concerns of the playwright, and where and how they are expressed in their work. It also involves exploring one or more of the following:

  • the social and/or historical world of the playwright as it relates to the chosen texts
  • the common and/or contrasting ideas and concerns evident in the plays
  • the style, structure and purpose of the plays.
  • the performance space and its influence on the plays.

Extracts from two or more texts must be examined.

The student in role has made reference to the use of varied rhyme schemes, prose and the use of iambic pentameter within The Taming of the Shrew byWilliam Shakespeare(1). They indicate a function of the playwright’s works (2) and note that Hamlet addresses what happens if the ‘Great Chain of Being’ is upset. (2)

There is reference to the attitude to the status and education of women (3). Thus, the student does indicate awareness of concerns that influence Shakespeare’s writing.

The student alludes to Shakespeare’s stance on marriage (4). The student indicate’s the notion of revenge, and its importance by linking it to the progress of Hamlet’s father to heaven (5) and the influence of religion (6).

For a more secure Achieved, the student couldgive a more detailed explanation of the purpose for use of the stylisticfeatures they had identified for example, noting that particular characters speak in blank verse and others in prose.

Student 5 (PDF, 83KB)

High Not Achieved

CommentaryStudent response

For Achieved, the student needs to examine the work of a playwright.

This involves exploring the concerns of the playwright, and where and how they are expressed in their work.  It also involves exploring one or more of the following:

  • the social and/or historical world of the playwright as it relates to the chosen texts
  • the common and/or contrasting ideas and concerns evident in the plays
  • the style, structure and purpose of the plays.
  • the performance space and its influence on the plays.

Extracts from two or more texts must be examined.

The student presents in-role as both Katarina from Shakespeare’s Taming of the Shrew, and Gertrude from Shakespeare’s Hamlet, giving some indication of an understanding of the plots of both plays (1). Quotes from the plays are used in the presentation (2). The style of the language in the plays is mentioned (3).

To reach Achieved, the student needs to ensure accuracy with the facts that they have presented in their examination. The student could focus on the concerns and features that are named in this presentation, clarify their meaning and discuss them in terms of where and how they are expressed in the work.

Student 6 (PDF, 78KB)

 
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