Drama - annotated exemplars level 3 AS91512 (A)

Interpret scripted text to integrate drama techniques in performance (3.1A)

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This annotated exemplar is intended for teacher use only. The student work shown does not always represent a complete sample of what is required. Selected extracts are used, focused on the grade boundaries, in order to assist assessors to make judgements at the national standard.

Low Excellence

Commentary
Student response

Student 1 (PDF, 156KB)

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For Excellence, the student needs to interpret scripted text to integrate drama techniques effectively in performance.

This involves integrating techniques to support and enhance the interpretation of the scripted text. The performance draws out layers of meaning. It is sustained, truthful, convincing, and has impact.

The student plays Estragon from Waiting For Godot by Samuel Beckett, as an ageing clown in a deserted theatre. He is wearing glasses and carrying a ‘cane’.

00:00-00:13

Convincing motivation for the uncertainty and expectancy from the intention is reflected in the scene: the clown/tramps cannot find their expected audience and so question whether they are in the right time and place.

00:15-02:32

Sustained performance choices such as the limp, use of the cane and the lurching of his movement truthfully communicate Estragon’s ill-fitting boot. Techniques are effectively integrated, sustained and convincingly show that Estragon is older and more cynical than Vladmir, and that he is moody unless he is performing in the rope circle when he feigns charisma.

02:43-04:21

A clear understanding of the relationship between the two performers is expressed with impact, and the performance idea is fresh, expressed with assurance and poignant since there is no audience.

06:12-07:50

The student integrates techniques effectively in the double exit/reappear/collision sequence and layers of meaning are drawn out by performance.

For a more secure Excellence, the student could have more flexibility and give attention to vocal opportunities in performance to create more impact.

High Merit

Commentary
Student response

Student 2 (PDF, 97KB)

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For Merit, the student needs to interpret scripted text to integrate drama techniques skillfully in performance.

This involves integrating techniques to communicate the interpretation of the scripted text throughout the performance, with competence, control, and a sense of purpose. This involves dexterity in the sustained integration of voice, body, movement, and space.

The student plays Vladimir (in the green hat), a second rate entertainer, in an extract from Act II of Waiting for Godot, where Lucky's hat is found, confirming that he and Estragon are in the same place as in Act I in spite of their inability to recall it.

00:00

Vladimir's positive disposition is competently projected in expectation and preparation for the arrival of an audience and a clear sense of purpose drives the performance.

01:40-03:09

Competence and control are well demonstrated in the performed material to contrast the mood of fake happiness in the circle, and his true emotions of solemnity out of the rope circle.

04:28-05:13

The student shows dexterity and control in the miming sequence of Lucky and adds impact to the scene.

05:42-07:20

There is a sustained playfulness and buoyancy in the range of integrated techniques he develops, and this competently and skilfully communicates the interpretation of the text.

To reach Excellence, deeper internal motivation for the choreography is needed for the performed script to be more immediate and convincing. Sustained integration of voice with other techniques would add to their overall effectiveness and impact.

Low Merit

Commentary
Student response

Student 3 (PDF, 160KB)

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For Merit, the student needs to interpret scripted text to integrate drama techniques skillfully in performance.

This involves integrating techniques to communicate the interpretation of the scripted text throughout the performance, with competence, control, and a sense of purpose. This involves dexterity in the sustained integration of voice, body, movement, and space.

The student plays the role of Vladimir (the only female) in Act I of Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett. The scene involves two homeless characters who share their only possession, a sleeping bag.

00:00-01:00

The long wordless lead in to the scene establishes the situation. The student shows the futility of Vladimir's situation in her struggle to emerge from the sleeping bag.

02:01-02:50

Well controlled use of space and dexterous use of movement techniques are shown in the use of the sleeping bag to express the struggle to find rest or comfort.

05:09-05:45

Well controlled movement with the sleeping bag expresses at once the frustration and helplessness felt by Vladimir and the credible interpretation is strengthened by performance choices. 

06:34

The seated position, back to the audience shows resignation and the essential loneliness of the character and serves to communicate the meaning of the play.

For a more secure Merit, the student could integrate voice techniques to competently portray an older male, and include the use of pause where appropriate to match the student’s physical skill.

High Achieved

Commentary
Student response

Student 4 (PDF, 158KB)

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For Achieved, the student needs to interpret scripted text to integrate drama techniques in performance.

This involves integrating techniques to communicate a credible interpretation of the scripted text throughout the performance.

The student plays role of Estragon in Act II of Waiting for Godot by Samuel Becket. She is the only female in the scene.

00:00-01:00

The student lays the base state from which she will work and to which she will return. Her eye movement confirms the emptiness of the scene and her vocal build/movement and position show integration along with the space she chooses.

05:30-06:08

The communication problem is well planned and enacted in the several attempts Estragon makes as she tries to talk to Vladimir. This is a credible interpretation of the text, and some skilful integration of techniques is evident.

08:25-09:06

Integrated techniques work well to show Estragon's latest solution to the predicament. Supple movement, clear position and significant space are combined with some skill to communicate the mood changes and the intention to ‘find ways of passing the time’.

To reach Merit, the student could sustain body and movement with purpose to convey the masculinity and age of Estragon. Movement would need to be more definite, with all action reflecting the purpose intended.

Low Achieved

Commentary
Student response

Student 5 (PDF, 160KB)

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For Achieved, the student needs to interpret scripted text to integrate drama techniques in performance.

This involves integrating techniques to communicate a credible interpretation of the scripted text throughout the performance.

The student is the only performer in the scene as the role of Pozzo near the end of Act I of Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett. She uses boxes to represent the other characters in the scene.

00:00-01:35

Space is used appropriately to present the interpretation and in conjunction with planned techniques and ideas. ‘The exits and entrances at the start are circular but random because there are no real directions to follow.’

01:58-03:50

The performance techniques are integrated to communicate the interpretation at a rudimentary level: ‘The posh English voice to express superiority and my breathing is often a release for my anger or frustration.’

04:54-05:20

The techniques here are well integrated and effective to show a lofty, self-concerned figure and pitch is lowered to be more credible.

05:33-05:50

Techniques are integrated to convey the intention: ‘Self congratulatory and smug although he has reached no conclusions and achieved nothing’.

For a more secure Achieved, the student could integrate voice to imply the masculinity and pomposity of Pozzo as intended. This would strengthen the credibility of the interpretation. Some enterprise has been made in the use of space but there needs to be more clarity and purposefulness in the repeated actions for them to be a valid link to the text.

High Not Achieved

Commentary
Student response

Student 6 (PDF, 215KB)

For Achieved, the student needs to interpret scripted text to integrate drama techniques in performance.

This involves integrating techniques to communicate a credible interpretation of the scripted text throughout the performance.

There is no video evidence available at this grade. The student played Pozzo in Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett.

This student depicted Pozzo’s obsession with the arrangement of chairs credibly. Pozzo’s ‘showing off by using the tunnel created by them’ would be appropriate in terms of applying an interpretation to performance. Some integration of techniques would have showed the self-important behaviour of Pozzo.

To reach Achieved, the student needs to interpret and integrate the intended techniques credibly in performance and work within the requirements of the standard. For example, if an extract involving other characters is chosen, they too must maintain integrity with the purpose of the whole play.

 
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