Drama - annotated exemplars level 3 AS91515 (A)

Select and use complex performance skills associated with a drama form or period (3.4A)

Show: All Drama exemplars

Read the STANDARD

 

TKI Drama Assessment Resources

Download all these exemplars and commentary (PDF, 514KB)

This annotated exemplar is intended for teacher use only. The student work shown does not always represent a complete sample of what is required. Selected extracts are used, focused on the grade boundaries, in order to assist assessors to make judgements at the national standard.

Low Excellence

Commentary
Student response

Student 1 (PDF, 256KB)

Watch the video (opens in a new window)

For Excellence, the student needs to select and effectively use complex performance skills associated with a drama form or period.

This involves supporting and enhancing the performance, and drawing out layers of meaning. The performance is convincing, truthful to the drama or theatre form or period, and has impact.

The student is the only performer in the scene in an extract from Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett.

This student has selected performance skills consistent with absurdist theatre practice. A clear understanding of the purpose of absurdist theatre and relevant to the classic absurdist text used, is demonstrated (1).

Selected skills are strongly evidenced in performance.

00:00-01:10

The student begins the scene asleep which is repeated as a motif throughout the performance. This enhances the absurdist theme of ‘purposeless of existence’ shown by repetitive action  (2).

01:26-04:31

The idea that talking signified meaning in life, and his inability to do so effectively realises the interpretation that ‘this character represents the everlasting philosophical battle to find such meanings in life’ (3).

04:34-04:56

The universal message is convincingly conveyed through action: ‘when one concedes defeat and accepts the failure’ that the character is again able to speak (4).

08:05

Rising action is abruptly brought to a halt when Estragon falls asleep, at the beginning and end of my scene (6).

For a more secure Excellence, the student could sustain impact so that the overall effect is enhanced. The beginning sequence is extended beyond even the intentional exaggeration, with the result that impact is lost.

High Merit

Commentary
Student response

Student 2 (PDF, 239KB)

Watch the video (opens in a new window)

For Merit, the student needs to select and skillfully use complex performance skills associated with a drama form or period.

This involves sustaining the complex performance skills of the drama or theatre form or period with dexterity, competence, control and a sense of purpose.

The student is playing Estragon in an adaptation of Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot, set in a supermarket. Estragon is a 'supermarket checkout chick'. The student has fair hair in a ponytail and wears a black tee shirt with green lettering.

This student has established a clear interpretive intention selecting skills associated with the absurdist form (1).

Dexterity and a sustained sense of purposeful control are shown in the application of selected skills in the performed scenario.

01:24-02:00

The development of scanning into a ritual and then a competition is an effective escalation of an ordinary activity at the supermarket into a surreal state (2).

04:20-04:29

The scene is developed so as to intensify the impact of selected features, for example the checkout girl uses props such as the stool (for her vomiting sequence) and the broccoli (as a symbol of the tree in the play, but also as a bridal bouquet) (3).

To reach Excellence, the student could use skills to exemplify features such as ritual, repetition and surreal action to be crisper and more focused. Vocal techniques could show stronger control and refinement to create impact.

Low Merit

Commentary
Student response

Student 3 (PDF, 97KB)

Watch the video (opens in a new window)

For Merit, the student needs to select and skillfully use complex performance skills associated with a drama form or period.

This involves sustaining the complex performance skills of the drama or theatre form or period with dexterity, competence, control and a sense of purpose.

The student plays Estragon in a loosely interpreted scene from Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett. He wears a navy blue beanie and a heavy jersey with a patterned front.

This student has selected performance skills to exemplify absurdist theatre (1).

01:14-01:28

Physical exaggeration is shown in the comic 'watering' of the tree and the movement around the space, as well as Estragon's responses and sometimes misjudgements about what has been said to him.

02:14-02:30

The ritual and repetition of juggling and bouncing is established at a basic skill level.

03:04-03:08

05:16-05:36

The obsession with an object (the ball) is set up ('Stay with me') and confirmed when Estragon tries to eat it.

10:06-10:16

A clear cyclical ending is demonstrated when the anticipated dream escape comes to nothing, echoing the beginning and confirming that no progress has been made in the scene.

01:14-01:28

Physical exaggeration is shown in the comic 'watering 'of the tree and the movement around the space as well as Estragon's responses and sometimes misjudgements about what has been said to him.

For a more secure Merit, physical control and skill could be clearer and small naturalistic gestures eliminated. A tighter focus and intensity for the bounding activity could show its intended significance as a feature more purposefully.

High Achieved

Commentary
Student response

Student 4 (PDF, 96KB)

Watch the video (opens in a new window)

For Achieved, the student needs to select and use complex performance skills associated with a drama form or period.

This involves making choices and using the complex performance skills of the drama or theatre form or period to communicate a credible interpretation of the text or scenario.

The student plays Vladimir from Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett. He is wearing a red suit jacket and denim shorts.

This student has selected performance skills and a credible interpretation is worked for the scripted text (1). Planned performance skills are applied throughout the performance to communicate the interpretation.

01:36-01:57

02:10-02:13

The student uses pent up energy and anxiety to suggest the interpretation by exaggerated physical techniques.

04:00-04:18

Extended pauses are planned to enhance the essential isolation of the character, but in performance these are not fully realised.

04:59-05:12

An appropriate interpretive line is developed into some performance skills.

06:57-07:35

Clear features of absurdist theatre are applied to the interpretation, establishing a strong overall tone for the whole extract.

01:36-01:57

02:10-02:13

The student uses pent up energy and anxiety to suggest the interpretation by exaggerated physical techniques.

To reach Merit, the student could sustain the overall control and management of the planned performance. For example, naturalistic physical responses could be eliminated in favour of intended exaggeration.

Low Achieved

Commentary
Student response

Student 5 (PDF, 160KB)

Watch the video (opens in a new window)

For Achieved, the student needs to select and use complex performance skills associated with a drama form or period.

This involves making choices and using the complex performance skills of the drama or theatre form or period to communicate a credible interpretation of the text or scenario.

The student plays Vladimir from Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett and is wearing red.

This student has selected and planned performance skills associated with absurdist theatre (1). They are applied at some stages of the performance to communicate the interpretation.

01:00-01:10

The essential confusion of the character, symptomatic of the human condition, is sometimes played.

01:36-01:40

A sense of isolation is sometimes expressed through the selection of personal space.

01:43-01:56

 

The use of long pauses and non-communication between characters is shown.

09:08-09:28

Revisitation of the same situation symbolises human lack of progress or achievement.

01:00-01:10

The essential confusion of the character, symptomatic of the human condition, is sometimes played.

For a more secure Achieved, the student could match intention and performance more closely to demonstrate complex performance skills more visibly. The features demonstrated need sufficient clarity to convey the intent.

High Not Achieved

Commentary
Student response

Student 6 (PDF, 95KB)

For Achieved, the student needs to select and use complex performance skills associated with a drama form or period.

This involves making choices and using the complex performance skills of the drama or theatre form or period to communicate a credible interpretation of the text or scenario.

There is no video evidence available for this student.

This student has attempted selection of complex performance skills for absurdist theatre (1).

The chosen scenario involves playing both Boy and Vladimir in Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot. The sense of waiting and frustration is established, and the two roles are partly credible.

To reach Achieved, the student could select sufficient complex performance skills to exemplify the features of absurd theatre, and the performance skills demonstrated need detail, timing and definition to be visible.

 
Skip to main page content Accessibility page with list of access keys Home Page Site Map Contact Us newzealand.govt.nz