Latin - annotated exemplar level 3 AS91508

Analyse studied Latin texts (3.3)

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TKI Latin Assessment Resources

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This annotated exemplar is intended for teacher use only. The student work shown does not always represent a complete sample of what is required. Selected extracts are used, focused on the grade boundaries, in order to assist assessors to make judgements at the national standard.

Low Excellence

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 1 (PDF, 244KB)

For Excellence, the student needs to analyse, thoroughly, studied Latin literary text(s).

This involves:

  • selecting and fully expanding on particular points and drawing perceptive conclusions
  • giving unambiguous Latin references and/or quotations from resources and/or texts to support answers
  • providing an English explanation for any Latin reference or quotation.

This student has selected and fully expanded on particular points in texts by Juvenal and Pliny. The student notes, for example, that the theme of Rome as a hard and selfish city (3) is conveyed by Juvenal’s use of juxtaposition (2) and repetition (3). Pliny’s use of chiasmus (6) for characterisation is also analysed.

Unambiguous Latin quotations from texts with an English explanation are provided to support answers, for example ‘nil habuit Codrus, quis enim negat?et tamen illud perdidit totum nihil’ (Juvenal 208-209) (1) and ‘si tamen aut velocitate equorum aut hominum arte traherentur, esset ratio non nulla; nunc favent panno pannum amant’ (Pliny Ep.9.6) (5).

Perceptive conclusions are drawn about Juvenal’s use of figurative language to analyse the theme of Rome being an uncaring city (4) and Pliny’s use of chiasmus to characterise both the race-goers and himself (7).

For a more secure Excellence, the student could make an addition to the conclusion about Pliny’s character (7). For example, the student could state that  ‘in our age we acknowledge that people are affected by their socio-economic conditions but that notion would not have occurred to Pliny’.

High Merit

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 2 (PDF, 290KB)

For Merit, the student needs to analyse clearly, studied Latin texts.

This involves:

  • selecting and expanding on particular points
  • drawing reasoned conclusions.

This student has selected and expanded on particular points in Virgil’s Aeneid II. The student notes, for example, correspondences in the simile between taurus (4) and Laocoon, and the flight of the bull fugit (5) and the flight of Laocoon.

The student has expanded on the correspondence involving the words mugitus (1) and incertam (7). The student has fully expanded on correspondences involving the words aram (2), cervice (3) and saucius (4).

Reasoned conclusions have been very well made about Virgil’s purposes in using similes (8) (9). They raise this work to a high Merit.

To reach Excellence, the student could re-write the final sentence of the second conclusion (6) to clarify the meaning.

To fully expand on the particular point of substitution for description (9) the student could add that educated Romans might have witnessed this in Greek theatre. 

Low Merit

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 3 (PDF, 255KB)

For Merit, the student needs to analyse clearly, studied Latin texts.

This involves:

  • selecting and expanding on particular points
  • drawing reasoned conclusions.

This student has selected and expanded on particular points in Virgil’s Aeneid II. The student notes, for example, correspondences in the simile between taurus (3) and Laocoon, and the flight of the bull fugit (6) and the flight of Laocoon.

The student has also expanded on the correspondences involving the words mugitus (1) and excussit (4).

Reasoned conclusions have been drawn about the purpose of using similes (7) (8).

For a more secure Merit, the student could expand on the correspondences involving the words saucius (2) and cervice (5).

High Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 4 (PDF, 142KB)

For Achieved, the student needs to analyse studied Latin text(s).

This involves:

  • using linguistic and cultural knowledge to extract the significance and meaning of ideas and textual features such as theme, context, figurative language, symbolism, atmosphere, characterisation and scansion
  • drawing conclusions.

This student has used linguistic and cultural knowledge to clearly extract the meaning and significance of figurative language in texts by Juvenal and Pliny.

The student notes, for example, that Juvenal has used a rhetorical question (1) to show that the city was full of hazards and dangers. Pliny’s use of chiasmus (2) for characterisation is also analysed positive and negative conclusions about city life have been drawn (3) (4).

To reach Merit, the student could make reasoned conclusions. For example, the student might supplement the conclusion about Juvenal’s use of figurative language by adding “... where people can die and nobody will care enough to gather their remains for burial.”

Low Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 5 (PDF, 156KB)

For Achieved, the student needs to analyse studied Latin text(s).

This involves:

  • using linguistic and cultural knowledge to extract the significance and meaning of ideas and textual features such as theme, context, figurative language, symbolism, atmosphere, characterisation and scansion
  • drawing conclusions.

This student has used linguistic and cultural knowledge to extract the meaning and significance of figurative language in a text by Juvenal. The student notes, for example, Juvenal’s use of a diminutive adjective (1) to show how pathetic a poor Roman’s possessions are and a metaphor (3) to describe how poorly the buildings are constructed. Alliteration (2) is used to draw attention to the plight of inhabitants when a building catches fire.

Conclusions have been drawn about the use of figurative language (4) (5).

For a more secure Achieved, the student could expand on the dangerous houses (2) by explaining that the apartment blocks were many storeys high and usually had only one exit.  

High Not Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 6 (PDF, 129KB)

For Achieved, the student needs to analyse studied Latin text(s).

This involves:

  • using linguistic and cultural knowledge to extract the significance and meaning of ideas and textual features such as theme, context, figurative language, symbolism, atmosphere, characterisation and scansion
  • drawing conclusions.

This student has used linguistic and cultural knowledge to extract the meaning and significance of figurative language in a text by Juvenal. The student notes, for example, that Juvenal uses repetition (1) to express his distaste for the inhabitants of the city and a rhetorical question (2) to draw attention to the lack of empathy from the citizens.

A generalised conclusion has been drawn about Juvenal’s use of figurative language (3).

To reach Achieved, the student could draw further conclusions about life in Rome,   For example the student might say ‘The inhabitants of the city show no concern for each other when they are in need of food or shelter. They make no effort to enable the dead to be buried. Proper burial was important to the ancient Romans’. This would fulfil the criteria for Achieved.

 
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