Latin - annotated exemplar level 3 AS91509

Analyse a Roman viewpoint (3.4)

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This annotated exemplar is intended for teacher use only. The student work shown does not always represent a complete sample of what is required. Selected extracts are used, focused on the grade boundaries, in order to assist assessors to make judgements at the national standard.

Low Excellence

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 1 (PDF, 245KB)

For Excellence, the student needs to analyse thoroughly a Roman viewpoint.

This involves:

  • fully expanding on particular selected points
  • using unambiguous Latin references and /or quotations from resources and/or  previously studied material to support answers
  • drawing perceptive conclusions
  • Latin references may include mention of Roman artefacts, Latin terms, phrases, quotations, images, maps or other material
  • providing an English explanation for any Latin reference or quotation.

This student has fully expanded on particular selected points in texts by Pliny, Horace and Juvenal. The student notes, for example, Pliny’s attitude to his tranquil life in the country (1) and Juvenal’s view of the drawbacks of living in the town (9).

The pleasures of living in the town experienced by Horace (4) and the drawbacks as seen by Pliny (2)  are fully expanded on.

The particular points of the peaceful (3) and generous living conditions in the country (6) (8) are also fully expanded on.

Perceptive conclusions (10) (11) are drawn about the Roman point of view of life in the town and country.

Unambiguous Latin references from previously studied material, with an English explanation are used to support answers (3) (7).

For a more secure Excellence, the student could provide an English explanation for quacumque libido est, incedo solus (5). This would clarify which part of Horace’s experience is being referred to. It could also be explained that the town mouse has a terrifying experience in the city which leads to him preferring the safety of the country.

High Merit

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 2 (PDF, 252KB)

For Merit, the student needs to analyse clearly a Roman viewpoint.

This involves expanding on particular selected points unambiguously in English and drawing reasoned conclusions.

This student has expanded on particular selected points in texts by Juvenal and Horace. The student notes, for example, that Juvenal describes the city of Rome as a dangerous place (1) whereas Horace finds it pleasant (6).

The student has fully expanded on the dangers (2) (3) (4) (9) and the pleasures (7) of life in the city, and on the simple and generous life in the country (8).

Reasoned, rather than perceptive, conclusions have been drawn about the Roman view of life in the town and country (10) (11).

To reach Excellence, the student could provide an English explanation for the Latin ‘ad quartam iaceo’ (7), a Latin translation for ‘The poor chap has no hope of a boat across the muddy whirlpool nor any small coin to stretch out in his mouth’ (5), and an accurate English translation of Sat.3.245-246 (3), for example ’This one strikes us with an elbow, that one with a hard beam.’

The conclusion (10) could be expanded to become perceptive, for example, ‘…danger is present even for the rich if their guards turn against them’. This would then fulfil the criteria for Excellence.

Low Merit

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 3 (PDF, 185KB)

For Merit, the student needs to analyse clearly a Roman viewpoint.

This involves expanding on particular selected points unambiguously in English and drawing reasoned conclusions.

This student has expanded on particular selected points in the texts of Juvenal and Pliny. The student notes, for example, that Juvenal thinks housing conditions in Rome are dangerous (1) and that Pliny is inspired by his surroundings in the country (6).

The student has expanded on the particular points of the heartlessness of the citizens (3) and busy, sometimes pointless life in Rome (5). The quiet peacefulness of the country has also been expanded on (6).

Reasoned conclusions (4) (7) have been drawn about the Roman point of view on life in the town and the country.

For a more secure Merit, the student could specify that the sea and the shore provide inspiration for Pliny (6).

An English translation for ‘nos urbem … dormire ruina’(2) would also make this point less ambiguous.

High Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 4 (PDF, 199KB)

For Achieved, the student needs to analyse a Roman viewpoint.

This involves:

  • applying linguistic and socio-cultural knowledge to extract and explore ideas from previously studied written/visual material
  • drawing conclusions about the viewpoint. 

This student has applied linguistic and socio-cultural knowledge to extract and explore ideas in texts by Virgil, Juvenal and Horace The student notes, for example, Juvenal’s opinion of the ill-maintained insulae in the town (2) and Virgil’s idea that farmers are fortunate to live in the country (1). Horace’s contentment with city life is also explored (5).

The student explores the dangers (2) (4) and the pleasures (5) of life in the town. A view of the simple, sharing life in the country from previously studied written material is provided (3) (6).

Conclusions are drawn about the Roman viewpoint on life in the town and country (7) (8).

To reach Merit, the student could expand on the flimsy houses (2) and chaotic streets in the city (4) and on the dinner menu served by the country mouse (6).

The conclusions (7) (8) could be expanded to become reasoned. For example, the student might mention that Horace felt safe walking in the city, or expand on the lack of morals among the city’s inhabitants to supplement the points made (8).

Low Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 5 (PDF, 142KB)

For Achieved, the student needs to analyse a Roman viewpoint.

This involves:

  • applying linguistic and socio-cultural knowledge to extract and explore ideas from previously studied written/visual material
  • drawing conclusions about the viewpoint. 

This student has applied linguistic and socio-cultural knowledge to extract and explore ideas in a text by Horace. The student notes, for example, Horace’s view that life in the city can be both comfortable and perilous (3).

Horace’s view of the simple life and generous attitudes in the country (1), together with the dangers of the town amid the good life, is explored (3).

Socio-cultural knowledge has been displayed when describing the Roman habit of  getting slaves to taste food to detect poison (2).

Conclusions have been drawn about the Roman view of life in the town and country (4).

For a more secure Achieved, the student could explore the idea of the luxury to be found in the town mouse’s house (2), including the ivory couches and crimson cloths. This would contrast with the country mouse’s living conditions and give more evidence about life in the town.

High Not Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 6 (PDF, 156KB)

For Achieved, the student needs to analyse a Roman viewpoint.

This involves:

  • applying linguistic and socio-cultural knowledge to extract and explore ideas from previously studied written/visual material
  • drawing conclusions about the viewpoint.

This student has applied some linguistic and socio-cultural knowledge to extract and explore ideas in texts by Pliny, Juvenal and Horace. The student notes, for example, Pliny’s lack of interest in the entertainment on offer in the city (2).

The ideas of fear (4) and danger (5) in the city and the peaceful life in the country are explored (3).

Socio-cultural knowledge of Roman entertainment is applied (1).

To reach Achieved, the student could supply conclusions about the Roman viewpoint on life in the town and country, for example ’Juvenal and Pliny seem to dislike life in the city because it can be dangerous if you are poor, and tedious if you are rich. Life in the country seems to be safer and more peaceful’.

 
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