Visual Arts- annotated exemplars level 1 AS90917 (Resource A)

Produce a finished work that demonstrates skills appropriate to cultural conventions (1.5 - Kites)

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TKI Visual Arts Assessment Resources

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Low Excellence

Commentary
Student response

Student 1 (PDF, 1.2MB)

For Excellence the student needs to produce a finished work that demonstrates fluent control of skills appropriate to cultural conventions.

Fluency refers to the ability to comprehensively manage the production of work.

The student demonstrates a high level of technical fluency in the management of multiple processes and procedures including modelling (1), painting (2), and binding (3).

The regularity of the binding on the body (3) and lashings of the canvas wing (4) show the student has the ability to comprehensively manage the production of work as stated in Explanatory Note 2.

The student integrates paint and sculptural elements such as the glazing beneath the mask to enhance the three dimensional quality of the outcome (5). This level of refinement fulfils the ‘fluent control of skills’ requirement of the criteria for Excellence.

The Celtic designs drawn on the wings are taken from the student’s own cultural origins. These have been amalgamated with Māori Koru motifs to create a unique personal design (2) showing fluent control of design conventions to communicate ideas about identity.

For a more secure Excellence the student needs to demonstrate consistently fluent control of allskills appropriate to the cultural conventions relevant to the identified context. For example, the finished kite should at least appear to be capable of flight. This means that larger wings would be needed in relation to the mass of the body and head.  

High Merit

Commentary
Student response

Student 2 (PDF, 1.1MB)

For Merit the student needs to produce a finished work that demonstrates control of skills appropriate to cultural conventions.

Control refers to the ability to use media according to an art-making intention.

The student demonstrates the control of technical conventions such as modelling with clay (1), blending with paint (2), and binding with fibre (3) for achievement with Merit.

The student is approaching the level of fluent control required for Excellence in some design aspects, for example in the elegant structural design and sympathetic integration of materials and techniques.

The finished work reveals a degree of design innovation while adhering well to traditional Manu Tukutuku proportional relationships. Being able to make successful personal adaptations demonstrates the student’s understanding of the design constraints relevant to the kite context.

For Excellence the student would need to comprehensively manage all elements of the production of new work. This would include attention to details such as the fitting of canvas shapes to the wing space (4), consistency of the painted designs (2) and trimming of wooden elements (5).

The student may also consider greater integration of traditional Māori features in key areas such as the head piece (1).

Low Merit

Commentary
Student response

Student 3 (PDF, 1.2MB)

For Merit the student needs to produce a finished work that demonstrates control of skills appropriate to cultural conventions.

Control refers to the ability to use media according to an art-making intention.

The student demonstrates some control of both design and fabrication skills appropriate to the Manu Tukutuku context. 

The head, wing and body relationships are all consistent with the traditional Manu Tukutuku proportions. The control of design principles is evident in the aerodynamically plausible outcome.

The finished work uses a range of materials and techniques appropriate to the cultural context including weaving (1) and lashings (2).

The consistent use of earth tones across all the different materials helps to unify the kite. This colouring is consistent with the stylistic properties of the Manu Tukutuku, which demonstrates the management of media according to a specific art-making intention required for Merit.

For a more secure Merit the student would need to demonstrate more skilful control of construction processes and painting techniques. Particular attention needs to be placed on the regularity and even tension of the bindings throughout the wings and tail (2).

A secure Merit student would also need to demonstrate greater control of modelling techniques in the head (3) through more attention to detail and the inclusion of traditional Māori design features.

High Achieved

Commentary
Student response

Student 4 (PDF, 993KB)

For Achieved the student needs to produce a finished work that demonstrates skills appropriate to cultural conventions.

Skills appropriate to cultural conventions include:

  • knowledge of processes and procedures specific to the cultural context
  • thinking through the use of materials and processes
  • planning and development of ideas that contribute to the final work
  • collaborative and/or other protocols appropriate to the cultural context.

The student demonstrates skills in the production of a finished work that appropriately uses negative space (1), repetition of form (2), monochromatic colour, and symmetry to create a harmonious outcome.

The control of painting material and techniques in terms of blending and edge control show the skills are operating at a Merit level.

For Merit the student would need to show control of all processes and procedures relevant to the cultural context. This includes traditional construction techniques such as lashing, weaving and plaiting. For example flax fibre rather than glue should be used for binding.

The student could also show greater consideration of appropriate aerodynamic conventions by having the wings larger. This would enhance the plausibility of flight potential in the finished work.

Low Achieved

Commentary
Student response

Student 5 (PDF, 1.1MB)

For Achieved the student needs to produce a finished work that demonstrates skills appropriate to cultural conventions.

Skills appropriate to cultural conventions include:

  • knowledge of processes and procedures specific to the cultural context
  • thinking through the use of materials and processes
  • planning and development of ideas that contribute to the final work
  • collaborative and/or other protocols appropriate to the cultural context.

The student demonstrates sufficient application of design conventions and technical skills in the finished work to meet the level one expectations of the standard.

The design adheres to the specific Manu Tukutuku cultural context through the inclusion of head, body, wings and tails. The kite is made of appropriate natural materials such as cane (1), bamboo (2), clay (3), and toi toi (4). The student demonstrates sufficient technical skill with weaving (1), lashings (4), carving (2) and modelling (2).

For a more secure Achieved the student would need to demonstrate more skilful use of techniques. For example more consistent tension should be maintained in the lashings and wing panel bindings (5). 

Further consideration of design elements is also needed. For example larger wings and tail in relation to the weight of the body and head would increase the flight potential of the kite.

High Not Achieved

Commentary
Student response

Student 6 (PDF, 1.4MB)

For Achieved the student needs to produce a finished work that demonstrates skills appropriate to cultural conventions.

Skills appropriate to cultural conventions include:

  • knowledge of processes and procedures specific to the cultural context
  • thinking through the use of materials and processes
  • planning and development of ideas that contribute to the final work
  • collaborative and/or other protocols appropriate to the cultural context.

The student demonstrates some awareness of structural conventions through the use of lashing and binding to make the kite structurally secure. The student shows awareness of the Manu Tukutuku cultural context through the symmetrical design which includes head, wing and body elements. The student also uses natural materials and colours to reflect the traditional nature of the context.

For Achieved the student would need to show more consistent skills appropriate to the identified cultural convention, for example, more regular knotting and even tension in the bindings of the structure (1).

More skilful management of generic materials and techniques, such as the paint blending in the wing panels (2) and clay modelling in the face (3), is also needed for Achieved.

 
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