Visual Arts (Design) - annotated exemplars level 2 AS91305

Design - Demonstrate an understanding of methods and ideas from established practice appropriate to design (2.1)

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This annotated exemplar is intended for teacher use only. The student work shown does not always represent a complete sample of what is required. Selected extracts are used, focused on the grade boundaries, in order to assist assessors to make judgements at the national standard.

Low Excellence

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 1 (PDF, 5.8MB)

For Excellence, the student needs to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of methods and ideas from established practice appropriate to design.

This involves identifying and documenting particular information through the analysis of methods and ideas from established practice, in order to explain how and why artworks are related to the context in which they are made, viewed and valued.

In this extract the student has investigated the graphic design work of David Carson.

The student explains how a range of design features are used to create specific effects or communicate meaning, for example by explaining Carson’s methods and ideas about colour (3).

The student also makes reference to contexts in which Carson’s work was viewed (e.g. RayGun and surfing magazines), and relates this to other magazine contexts (Vogue and Time), in order to explain how Caron’s ‘rough’ and ‘disrupted’ use of typeface is distinct from the ‘clean’, ‘careful’ and ‘clear’ text of other magazines of the time (2).

The student shows in-depth understanding of the context of Carson’s work, identifying specific influences that can only be found by researching appropriate sources, for example with references to Dada and Wabi Sabi (1).

For a more secure Excellence, the student could support all statements with evidence from appropriate research sources. For example the statement ‘He wanted to start a revolution against the fake design that had no soul’ (2) would need the support of a specific relevant quote from Carson himself.

The student could also explain how the generic discussion of text on page two (4) specifically relates to the RAW double page spread being analysed.

High Merit

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 2 (PDF, 5.5MB)

For Merit, the student needs to demonstrate an informed understanding of methods and ideas from established practice appropriate to design.

This involves identifying and documenting particular information about how methods and ideas from established practice are used, with reference to the context in which artworks are made, viewed and valued.

In this extract the student has investigated the work of Neville Brody.

The student demonstrates informed understanding by explaining how particular design features are used to create specific effects and/or communicate meaning. For example, the student identifies that small amounts of red are used to direct the viewers’ attention to key parts of the design (1).

The student links Brody’s work to wider contexts, such as the Bauhaus and Swiss typography movements (2).

In discussing the advertising design for the Oceans 11 and 12 films, the student explains how the designer has refrained from highlighting individual actors, to reflect the fact that the film has an ensemble cast (4). This shows informed understanding of how art works are viewed. 

To reach Excellence, the student could provide fuller explanations of how other design movements (2) have influenced Brody. For example, the student could note the use of typical Bauhaus features in the Oceans 11 and 12 posters, such as the sans serif font, and the black, red and white colour scheme.

The student would also need to use particular information to support their statements. For example the reference to the '50s feel of the design (3) could be supported with a citation from a film review that refers to this aspect of the film.

Low Merit

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 3 (PDF, 4.8MB)

For Merit, the student needs to demonstrate an informed understanding of methods and ideas from established practice appropriate to design.

This involves identifying and documenting particular information about how methods and ideas from established practice are used, with reference to the context in which artworks are made, viewed and valued.

In this extract the student has investigated the work of Neville Brody and David Carson.

The student shows some consideration of the relationship between the work and a wider context, with reference to the ‘youth culture’ market (3). The quote (1) is evidence of the personal research (books, magazines, internet) needed to show the informed understanding required.

An informed understanding of generic design methods is shown in the discussion of how particular design features are used to create specific effects. For example how negative space has been used in the Brody design (2).

For a more secure Merit, the student would need to make stronger connections between the technical features and communicative intention of particular design approaches. For example, for the Carson design, Blue Note Gallery is mentioned (4), but no explanation is provided for how the stylistic features communicate ideas about the client.

More regular and explicit use of supporting references from research sources is also needed for a secure Merit. This may include appropriate quotes from David Carson, and/or commentaries about his work from books, magazines or design websites.

High Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 4 (PDF, 3.6MB)

For Achieved, the student needs to demonstrate an understanding of methods and ideas from established practice appropriate to design.

This involves identifying and documenting information about methods and ideas from established practice, with reference to the context in which artworks are made, viewed and valued.

In this extract the student has investigated the work of Neville Brody and David Carson, systematically unpacking the visual and technical features of both artists. For example the discussion of positive and negative space (4) shows a sound understanding of how design principle has been used.

Some passages begin to present more informed understanding of particular ideas and meaning. For example, the ‘red text…’ (1) is an Achieved level descriptive response. However the reference to Blood spent…’ (2) begins to show Merit level understanding of the ideas that underpin the design. This second point indicates that appropriate research has occurred.

To reach Merit, the student could support their comments about design features with explanations of how features are used to communicate ideas. For example, the student states that the design ‘would not need colour’ (5) without explaining the reasons for making the design black and white.

The student relies on pictorial intelligence rather than information from research sources. For example, the student states that Ezer and Bauhaus (3) use similar techniques. A reference to a research source explaining the relationships or influences of these artists would show the informed understanding required for Merit.

Low Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 5 (PDF, 3.6MB)

For Achieved, the student needs to demonstrate an understanding of methods and ideas from established practice appropriate to design.

This involves identifying and documenting information about methods and ideas from established practice, with reference to the context in which artworks are made, viewed and valued.

In this extract the student has investigated the work of Neville Brody.

The student makes some comments that show understanding about the relationship between design features and communicative intentions. For example a statement on page one (1) explains how cropping has been used as a focal device.

The complete sample presents four pages of analysis with the template ensuring that both the methods (colour, composition, imagery, text) and ideas (message, client, target market) are discussed.

For a more secure Achieved, the student could move beyond the identification of design features to describe how they are used to communicate ideas.

For example, in the second page that identifies design features by stating that ‘Images use negative spaces around them to gain attention’ (3). A secure Achieved response could then go on to explain the design principle of balancing intense action with quiet areas, and may use specific terms like ‘breathing space’.

The student could also include information from research sources rather than relying on a general knowledge of design methods and ideas. For example typing ‘Neville Brody, Inventing a Graphic Language’ (2) into a search engine would identify several commentaries and discussions about the designer and this work.

High Not Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 6 (PDF, 3.7MB)

For Achieved, the student needs to demonstrate an understanding of methods and ideas from established practice appropriate to design.

This involves identifying and documenting information about methods and ideas from established practice, with reference to the context in which artworks are made, viewed and valued.

In this extract the student has investigated a work by Neville Brody and a work by David Carson.

The student has started to make connections between the stylistic devices used and the communicative intentions of the selected designs. For example, the student makes a connection between the ‘out of focus’ images and how armature photography may appeal to the target audience (4). 

The student correctly identifies that the use of negative space and monochrome values are important in designs by Neville Brody (1).

The student attempted to describe design features (colour, text, layout, etc) and intentions (message, client, target market).

To reach Achieved, the student could present more sustained documentation of the methods and ideas of the identified designers. It is expected that a student would need to discuss at least two works by each designer, or research a third artist, in order to demonstrate sufficient understanding.

Further, the student could document information about the relationships between methods and ideas rather than simply identify and describe features in isolation. For example, the first and second points about Carson’s composition (2) are simple descriptive statements.

The third statement (3) begins to discuss an intended effect. For Achieved, this effect could be more fully explained, and supported with evidence from a research source.

 
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