Visual Arts (Design) - annotated exemplars level 2 AS91310

Use drawing methods to apply knowledge of conventions appropriate to design (2.2)

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TKI Visual Arts Assessment Resources

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This annotated exemplar is intended for teacher use only. The student work shown does not always represent a complete sample of what is required. Selected extracts are used, focused on the grade boundaries, in order to assist assessors to make judgements at the national standard.

Low Excellence

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 1 (PDF, 2.8MB)

For Excellence, the student needs to use drawing methods to apply in-depth knowledge of conventions appropriate to design.

This involves critically selecting and using particular processes, procedures, materials, techniques and pictorial conventions according to an intended purpose when making artworks.

This student has demonstrated considered selection and consistently assured application of digital manipulation, typographic, and layout conventions appropriate to promotional brief. This shows purposeful use of the particular characteristics and constraints to achieve a specific outcome. For example, the fragmenting of the top half on each letter in the word ‘islands’ (1) (2) effectively communicates the concept of flight relevant to the bird sanctuary proposition.

The success of the outcomes (2) (4) are founded in the thorough research of the topic on page one and design models (3) (6). In-depth understanding is demonstrated where the sample integrates precedents rather than simply modifying existing solutions. For example, the stacked nil-kerning of the ‘spring tide’ (3) and gun (4) have been recombined with textural, colour and tonal innovations in the final outcome (5).

For a more secure Excellence, the student could take even greater ownership of ideas by further developing personal typographic and visual solutions. This may include developing original resource material rather than relying on appropriated images (6) (7). Developing imagery through drawing or photography enables students to show a greater understanding of the characteristics and constraints relevant to marketing and print based design contexts.

High Merit

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 2 (PDF, 618KB)

For Merit, the student needs to use drawing methods to apply specific knowledge of conventions appropriate to design.

This involves selecting and using particular processes, procedures, materials, techniques and pictorial conventions according to an intended purpose when making artworks.

This student has shown successful application of knowledge of contemporary typography and layout practices to produce a specific logo (5) and promotional outcomes (7). The success of these outcomes is based on a clearly identified thematic purpose (1) supported by research of appropriate visual resources (2) and established practice (3).

The logo investigation uses typographic conventions such as scale, weight, and zero leading, combined with a simplified small house form (4). This allows the student to explore graphic responses to the tag line ‘Thinking inside the box’ communicating the small house theme of the proposal.

To reach Excellence, the student could show more critical selection by further refining the postcard sequence. This may include reconsidering the graphic and typographic strengths of some the developmental ideas (6) and/or reconsidering the visual relationship between logo and postcard (5) (7). For example, unifying the colour and font selections may result in a more cohesive branding identity demonstrating an in-depth understanding of graphic marketing conventions.

Low Merit

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 3 (PDF, 1.3MB)

For Merit, the student needs to use drawing methods to apply specific knowledge of conventions appropriate to design.

This involves selecting and using particular processes, procedures, materials, techniques and pictorial conventions according to an intended purpose when making artworks.

This student has demonstrated application of specific typographic conventions to engage the viewer and promote an ecological message. These conventions include inversion, repetition, rotation and size/placement to manage text hierarchy.

While the preliminary concepts use the interplay between positive and negative elements for decorative effect (1), the final design (4) uses it for a specific communicative purpose. For example, the white ‘S’ in the final outcome draws attention to the silhouette being a bottle rather than another building.

The student shows considered selection by abandoning the more complicated illustrative ideas (2) that tend to confuse the issue. Removing the photographic bottles from the later concepts (3) results in a stronger, more unified graphic solution (4).

For a more secure Merit, the student could further refine some of the less comfortable placements of typographic features in the final poster. For example, in the ‘to’ could be shifted to sit between the ‘s’ of trash and ‘o’ of towers which would activate the in-between void and make the message more instantly legible. A more sustained investigation of established typographic practice would inform more specific application of particular conventions.

Establishing a clear connection between colour/shape and meaning, such as water or bubbles, would show more deliberate and informed knowledge of design convention of pictorial communication.

High Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 4 (PDF, 764KB)

For Achieved, the student needs to use drawing methods to apply knowledge of conventions appropriate to design.

This involves using processes, procedures, materials, techniques and pictorial conventions when making artworks.

This student has applied typographic conventions, such as different font sizes, weight, and placement to create a visually engaging logo outcome (2). The integration of the stop symbol reinforces the primary message.

The poster outcomes (4) show knowledge of digital manipulation and layout conventions. The visual style of the campaign is unified by the choice of using the same font, and the visual device of using the large capital ‘D’ from the logo for the ‘Reuse, Recycle, Reduce’ messages of the final poster (5). The student has considered placement of image and text to ensure the graphic element has impact and the words are legible.

To reach Merit, the student could further refine the conventions specific to the poster context. This may include more considered application of the typography, and simplified graphic conventions demonstrated in the identified design models (1). The background of the logo in the final outcome (5) may be lightened to enhance its impact and legibility.

Alternatively, the student may show more deliberate selection through the production or recombination of their own visual imagery for the poster outcomes through photography, drawing or digital processes. For example, the descending trash and cityscape concept (3) could be merged with the hourglass idea to create a self-generated graphic.

Low Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 5 (PDF, 3.1MB)

For Achieved, the student needs to use drawing methods to apply knowledge of conventions appropriate to design.

This involves using processes, procedures, materials, techniques and pictorial conventions when making artworks.

This student has explored typographic and layout conventions to promote an ecological message about using old gold to reduce the impact of continued mining. Topic information (1), design artist models (2), and possible resource images (3) have been identified.

The student has trialled some typographic conventions including positive/negative interchange (4) and textural overlays (5). Bold font styles are selected to enable these conventions to be used while retaining sufficient legibility.

A range of poster options are created (6) by explicitly emulating selected artist model solutions (2).

For a more secure Achieved, the student could refine some of the decisions presented in the final outcome (7) to more effectively communicate the ecological message. This may include rearranging the ‘Buy old gold – Bye new gold’ catch phrase, which is easily overlooked in the top left corner. Placing greater emphasis on the ‘buy’ and ‘bye’ would clarify the message.

Annotating the developmental imagery (6) regarding strengths and weaknesses, may enable the student to more successfully apply their knowledge of design conventions.

The student could also consider developing their own imagery through drawing or photography. While open-cast gold mines may not be accessible, the student could document other wasteland style imagery from their own local environment. Self-generated imagery contributes to an understanding of the visual characteristics and constraints applicable to the print design context.

High Not Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 6 (PDF, 2.1MB)

For Achieved, the student needs to use drawing methods to apply knowledge of conventions appropriate to design.

This involves using processes, procedures, materials, techniques and pictorial conventions when making artworks.

This student has identified a conservation theme (1) and gathered relevant information (2), imagery (3) and artist models (4). Typographic options are explored (5) which show consideration of reduced kerning to create impact, and the integration of the shark fin silhouette in keeping with the theme.

The poster outcomes (9) combine the typographic element with generic fishing boat and net imagery.

To reach Achieved, the student could recognise that the more effective shark fin silhouette is letter A (5) which aligns with the positive/negative form rather than diminishing the legibility of the letter when used with the H (6). More sustained investigation of relevant design practices may enable the student to demonstrate more convincing knowledge of typographic and illustrative conventions.

The secondary slogan ‘Sharks…Yeah Right’ is ambiguous and could be reconsidered to more effectively communicate the key preservation message. The length and content of the body text (8) should also be reconsidered. For example, a shorter, more evocatively relevant statement, such as ‘Sharks attack by mistake, humans attack for a bowl of tasteless soup’ may be more immediate and effective.

Further exploration of a range of appropriate imagery rather than the fishing boat, ideally self-generated, may lead to a more effective outcome. This may include the humorous potential of the boxing glove (7) or the cartoon graphic potential of the artist models (4) to present great white sharks in a less-threatening way.

 
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