Visual Arts (Sculpture) - annotated exemplars level 2 AS91314

Use drawing methods to apply knowledge of conventions appropriate to sculpture (2.2)

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TKI Visual Arts Assessment Resources

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This annotated exemplar is intended for teacher use only. The student work shown does not always represent a complete sample of what is required. Selected extracts are used, focused on the grade boundaries, in order to assist assessors to make judgements at the national standard.

Low Excellence

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 1 (PDF, 16MB)

For Excellence, the student needs to use drawing methods to apply in-depth knowledge of conventions appropriate to sculpture.

This involves critically selecting and using particular processes, procedures, materials, techniques and pictorial conventions according to an intended purpose when making artworks.

This student has demonstrated a sound understanding of two and three dimensional sculptural conventions, including concept drawing, site sensitivity, planning, fabrication, installation and documentation.

The depth of understanding grows throughout the investigation, with the architectural and wrapping ideas of the first outcome (1) being further refined in the second work (2). The second outcome shows critical selection in the specific sculptural conventions of wrapping and repetition to transform architecture.

The final outcome (6) uses architectural model making to recontextualize the conceptual conventions explored in the preceding work. This work moves beyond the explicit application of Christo’s wrapping conventions to show more independent critical selection of  sculptural forms and materials.

The strength of all sculptural pieces is supported by a thorough identification of particular sculptural conventions (3), well-conceived and visualised planning (4), and intelligent photo-documentation of each piece (5) (6). 

For a more secure Excellence, the student could further resolve technical aspects of the final work (6), which explores very different sculptural materials and techniques.

Alternatively, the student may further refine the technical, procedural and conceptual ideas of the first two outcomes (1) (2). This could result in deeper understanding of that particular sculptural convention.

High Merit

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 2 (PDF, 12MB)

For Merit, the student needs to use drawing methods to apply specific knowledge of conventions appropriate to sculpture.

This involves selecting and using particular processes, procedures, materials, techniques and pictorial conventions according to an intended purpose when making artworks.

This student has produced three quite different sculptural outcomes (3) (4) (5) with equally successful application of specific sculptural conventions. The first two outcomes adhere closely to the specific conventions of Christo (3) and Eve Armstrong (4). This emulative approach as an initial strategy ensures the student’s understand of particular procedural, technical and conceptual conventions.

The research (1) shows sound understanding of key sculptural conventions. The planning page (2) shows appropriate use of concept drawing and sculptural annotation.

The final work (5) is a more personal outcome, influenced by Joanna Langford and Tara Donovan. This implicit application of selected conventions in the context of the student’s own ideas shows the more developed understanding needed for higher levels of achievement.

To reach Excellence, the student could show greater consistency of either methods or concepts. Related, rather than episodic, outcomes may have enhanced this student’s opportunity to deepen their understanding of a particular sculptural approach.

Alternatively, the student could have shown deeper understanding of one approach by producing a second work that further refines the identified methods and ideas. This may show the critical selection (required for Excellence) of sculptural elements and techniques to support the conceptual purpose. 

Low Merit

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 3 (PDF, 16MB)

For Merit, the student needs to use drawing methods to apply specific knowledge of conventions appropriate to sculpture.

This involves selecting and using particular processes, procedures, materials, techniques and pictorial conventions according to an intended purpose when making artworks.

This student has applied a variety of drawing and fabrication conventions to the making of three significant (2) (4) (6) sculptural outcomes.

The second installation (4) is characterised by a gravity curve not anticipated in the initial concept drawing (3). The student appears to have taken note of this effect in the planning page and third outcome (5) (6), which feature suspension and curves.

The three dimensional imagining, structural considerations, technical annotations and concept notes of the final planning page (5) are entirely consistent with these conventions.

For a more secure Merit, the student could further refine the structural and conceptual ideas of the final piece. A clearer connection between the conceptual ideas and physical product would strengthen the ‘intended purpose’ required for Merit (see Explanatory Note 2).

The student could also show a stronger link between the methods and ideas identified in the initial investigation (1) and the first outcome (2). This would more clearly show the purposeful application of specific conventions (needed for Merit) in this particular work.

High Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 4 (PDF, 15MB)

For Achieved, the student needs to use drawing methods to apply knowledge of conventions appropriate to sculpture.

This involves using processes, procedures, materials, techniques and pictorial conventions when making artworks.

This student has applied knowledge of a variety sculptural conventions including: concept drawing and annotation (1); the use of recycled materials (2) (4); re-contextualising materials to create meaning and humour (2); the juxtaposition of organic and geometric (4); the consideration of site specific contexts (2) (4); the use of architectural modelling and the creation of a world in miniature scale (5).

The formal theme of geometric versus organic forms is central to the investigation. In the second work (4) the organic tree represents the primary environment with the geometric boxes being the introduced elements. This is reversed in the final work (5), with the organic plastic clouds being imposed on a geometric structure.

The student also explores the relationship between linear (string/sticks) and mass (box/tree/clouds) elements in both works.

Appropriate documentation conventions are used to provide whole object, detailed close up, and alternative viewpoints (5).

To reach Merit, the student could show more explicit connection between methods and ideas. For example, for the tree sculpture, the suspended versus grounded groupings of boxes in the planning drawing (3) are not clear in the physical work (4).

Further experimentation in the final work (5) could also make the towers and clouds idea of the concept drawing (1) more apparent.

Low Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 5 (PDF, 13MB)

For Achieved, the student needs to use drawing methods to apply knowledge of conventions appropriate to sculpture.

This involves using processes, procedures, materials, techniques and pictorial conventions when making artworks.

This student has researched (1), planned (4) (5) and produced two appropriate sculptural outcomes (7) (8). The approach applies the identified sculptural conventions of recycling (2), stacking/repetition (3) and site based practices (1).

The planning drawings use appropriate concept visualisation (4) and site consideration (5) drawing techniques. These drawings are fit for purpose and accompanied by annotations that indicate a particular intention (6).

The documentation photographs are appropriate in terms of multiple views that include the whole object in relation to the site and more detailed close ups.

For a more secure Achieved, the student could more clearly position the intention of the outcomes. The work would need to either more clearly be a robot presence guarding the tuck shop (7) or be a purely architectural obstruction blocking the exit (8), without the robot head and feet.

At the fabrication stage, the student could have tried a variety of alternative configurations to enhance the conceptual intention of the outcome. This would have resulted in a more informed application of the identified sculptural practice.

High Not Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 6 (PDF, 11MB)

For Achieved, the student needs to use drawing methods to apply knowledge of conventions appropriate to sculpture.

This involves using processes, procedures, materials, techniques and pictorial conventions when making artworks.

This student has presented two pages of research (1) which show knowledge of sculptural conventions, although this knowledge needs to be applied in the practical outcomes.

The first series of concept drawings (2) explore an appropriate approach to a site specific architectural intervention. The second series of drawings (3) explores a more complex stand-alone outcome. The student uses a variety of fabrication processes and materials to make the art works (4) (5).

To reach Achieved, the student could ensure that the use of processes, procedures, materials and techniques in the sculptural outcomes is more proficient. The fabrication skills need to meet the New Zealand Curriculum Level 7 requirements of the standard (see Explanatory Note 1).

The student could also ensure that the potential of the conceptual ideas in the drawings is realised in the three-dimensional outcomes. For example, the interesting web barrier effect of the first drawing series (2) is not replicated in the first installation (4).

A useful approach may have been to follow one sculptural approach rather than shifting between two very different (4) (5) conceptual and technical practices.

 
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