Outcomes 1 to 6

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This section of the guidance is more detailed than the general guidance in earlier pages. It is meant to assist you, as a provider, to achieve the outcomes of the Code, and to act as a prompt for your thinking and planning.

It is a tool for you to use, if you choose to. It may be used as a set of prompts to guide your review, but it is not an exhaustive guide, nor are the suggestions and examples mandatory.

This section looks at each outcome and each process within the outcome. It:

  • gives examples of good practice for the outcome, which you are encouraged to apply to your context
  • provides examples of what it may look like to give effect to each process within the outcome, to act as a prompt and assist your thinking about how your practices could fulfil the process requirements
  • links to related processes that may require the same practices, and may provide additional examples and resources
  • lists resources to further help or support you meet the requirements of the Code.

Through this guidance we encourage you, as a provider, to build upon good practice, customise your processes to you and your students’ unique needs, and improve or protect the quality of pastoral care you provide for your students.

The same practices may contribute to multiple processes and outcomes and do not need to be considered independently. Providers can consider their practices across the interim Code as a whole, and areas of improvement may be identified that will improve the students’ experience across multiple outcomes.

General themes across all outcomes

There are some general themes that run across the whole Code that can be considered when working to meet each of the outcomes in the Code.

Developing relationships and partnerships

Consider how relationships and partnerships can be used as a mechanism to achieve the outcomes of the Code. This includes relationships and partnerships with students, staff who provide pastoral care, community groups, iwi and Māori organisations, and other providers to promote best practice.

Including the student voice in decisions that affect learners

Consider how to include students’ perspectives in making decisions about services and reviewing practices for student accommodation, health and support services, and promoting a learning community.

Providers are encouraged to know and understand the diversity of their students, listen to their students’ experiences and suggestions and make appropriate changes based on student feedback.

In particular, the perspectives of Māori and Pacific students must be considered.

It is also important to consider the perspectives of diverse or underrepresented groups and students who may need additional support.

Continuous quality improvement through self-review

Consider how to prioritise areas for self-review and use the self-review to make improvement plans and track progress against those plans. Also consider how best to involve students, staff and other relevant groups in the self-review process.

The wider legislative and regulatory context

The interim Code exists in a wider legislative and regulatory context. Some of the complementary legislation and information providers should be aware of include, but is not limited to:

The following Acts outline other legal requirements and responsibilities for providers to be aware of:

Outcome 1: A safe and supportive learning environment

Students experience a physically safe and mutually supportive learning environment that responds to the needs of all students.

Good practice

The learning and communal environment, whether on-site or online, is safe for all students and responds to their needs, irrespective of their cultural, ethnic, religious, linguistic, socio-economic or academic background, gender identity, sexual orientation, or any other identity they choose to express.

This is demonstrated through evidence of students’ experience of their safety and their learning environment. Particular consideration is given to Māori students’ experiences. Students from various Pacific Island cultures, other ethnic groups, and underrepresented groups of students are also considered.

Providers:

  • know and understand the diversity of their students
  • hear their students’ experiences and suggestions as to how they might improve the learning environment and the practices regarding student safety to better support their needs
  • implement appropriate changes in a timely manner, and/or develop an improvement plan that is implemented and tracked.

Enhancing student safety

Interim Code process: 7

(1) Providers must have practices that enhance student safety, including appropriate practices for –
(a) a safe learning and communal environments and facilities; and
(b) human resources management; and
(c) the security of students.

What this may look like

  • The physical environment, including grounds and facilities, are safe and secure. This may include having good lighting, adequate signage, and safe transport.
  • Learning services, on-site or online, are safe and secure.
  • The needs of the various groups of students, including Māori and Pacific students, are recognised and they have welcoming and safe places to connect and socialise.
  • Staff have adequate resources and training to ensure students are safe and secure and that systemic barriers to participation, such as discrimination or harassment, are reduced.

Related processes

Outcome 5

Resources

The Ministry of Education has information to support and promote the health, safety and wellbeing of staff and students on their website.

Maintaining a supportive learning environment

Interim Code process: 7

(2) Providers must have practices that maintain a supportive learning environment and provide opportunities for students to connect, build relationships and support each other.

What this may look like

  • Students experience a culture of acceptance and inclusiveness and feel connected to and supported by other students. Barriers to students accessing their learning environment are identified and minimised.
  • Feedback from diverse groups of students is used to improve the learning environment, on-site or online, and the opportunities for students to connect. Māori and Pacific students’ perspectives are important contributors to establishing supportive learning environments, on-site or online, that address what is important for them.
  • Teaching staff understand tikanga, kaupapa, te reo, ako and te ao Māori.
  • A culture of acceptance and inclusiveness is fostered, and staff convey the value of learning experiences and the importance of a supportive community.
  • Students are encouraged and supported to establish study groups and cultural or interest groups to support their learning and to make connections with their peers.

Related processes

Outcome 5

Resources

The Ministry of Education has information on creating a supportive learning environment and the concept of ako. Although aimed at schools, this information can also be of use for tertiary education providers.

Outcome 2: Assistance for students to meet their basic needs

Students have adequate access to advice, information and services which help them to meet their basic needs.

Good practice

  • Students know where to seek advice, information and services on how to access support to meet their basic needs.
  • Students’ experiences of the advice, information and services provided show how they are supported to meet their basic needs and what areas need improvement. Attention is given to the different experiences students have in accessing services. The experiences of Māori and Pacific students are also specifically considered.
  • Providers understand the diversity of their students’ needs and seek suggestions from their students as to how they might improve the advice, information and services they offer. Providers implement appropriate changes in a timely manner, and/or develop an improvement plan that is implemented and tracked.

Meeting basic needs

‘Basic needs’ means the essential material requirements to support wellbeing including housing, food and clothing.

Interim Code process: 9

(1) Providers must have practices that assist students to identify and manage their basic needs, including providing information to all students, as soon as reasonably practicable, on –
(a) how students, including those who have work and family commitments, can access services on and off-campus that will help them maintain reasonable standards of material wellbeing, within the institution and externally; and
(b) how to access suitable accommodation and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

What this may look like

  • Students receive advice and assistance to identify and manage their basic needs, that is appropriate for their circumstances such as work and whānau/family commitments, their culture and their background. This information is provided prior to, or during, their initial enrolment, and as required throughout the duration of their study.
  • Students are provided with information about on-site, community or national services that can help them maintain reasonable standards of material wellbeing and are supported and encouraged to access these services. Barriers to access are identified and minimised.
  • Students are provided with information or services to help them find or apply for accommodation and maintain a healthy lifestyle.
  • Feedback is gathered in a collaborative way with students, to understand where their needs may not be getting met and where they need additional support. This feedback is used to improve the information provided to students and the practices for assisting students to identify and manage their basic needs.

Resources

On-site food options

Interim Code process: 9

(2) If food is made available by the provider on campus or in student accommodation, the provider must ensure that the food available includes a range of healthy food options that is obtainable at a reasonable cost.

What this may look like

  • Food options on-site or in student accommodation (where provided) include a range of healthy options.
  • Where food is available on-site for students to purchase, the healthy food options are affordable.
  • Feedback is sought from diverse groups of students to ensure the range and cost of food available on-site and in student accommodation meets their needs.

Resources

  • The Ministry of Health provides guidelines for healthy eating and is a valuable source of information for determining if there is sufficiently healthy food available on your campus.
  • Resources for healthy eating, including culturally appropriate resources, can be found at HealthEd.

Outcome 3: Physical and mental health of students

Students are assisted by providers to manage their physical and mental health, and to access support when needed.

Good practice

All students, of any culture, ethnicity, religion, gender identity, sexual orientation, or any other identity they choose to express, have the help, support and experiences they need to manage their physical and mental health appropriately.

This is demonstrated through students’ satisfaction of the support they receive and the access they have to appropriate services and experiences. Particular consideration is given to Māori students. Students from various Pacific Island cultures, other ethnic groups, and underrepresented groups of students are also given specific consideration.

Providers:

  • understand the diversity of their students’ needs, and who may be in need of additional support
  • seek suggestions from their students as to how they might improve the support they offer, and the access students have to appropriate services
  • implement appropriate changes in a timely manner, and/or develop an improvement plan that is implemented and tracked.

Improving physical and mental health

Interim Code process: 11

Providers must have practices which assist students to be physically and mentally healthy, including –
(a) providing opportunities for students to have experiences that improve their physical or mental health and wellbeing.

What this may look like

Diverse groups of students are involved in making decisions about the opportunities and experiences provided to them, on-site and online, to improve their physical and mental health and wellbeing.

Māori and Pacific students’ views on what practices are important for them inform the provision of opportunities, and cultural safety and appropriateness are incorporated in the opportunities and experiences provided.

Activities, facilities, services, and communities through which students can better their physical and mental health and connect with others are provided on-site or online.

Activities, facilities, services, and communities may include:

  • services such as a medical centre, counselling service and peer support
  • classes that promote mental health, such as yoga, meditation or relaxation
  • sports facilities, gym, exercise classes and equipment
  • workshops or podcasts where students can learn how to better take care of themselves.

Related processes

Outcome 6

Resources

  • The Health Promotion Agency promotes health and wellbeing, encourages healthy lifestyles, and offers a large range of information and support.
  • Te Rau Ora strengthens Māori health and wellbeing.
  • Le Va works alongside the services and people who deliver health and wellbeing services to develop flourishing Pasifika communities who are reaching their full potential.

Managing mental health

Interim Code process: 11

Providers must have practices which assist students to be physically and mentally healthy, including –
(b) assisting students to manage their mental health, by –
i. promoting awareness of wellbeing and mental health and practices that support good mental health that are relatable to students; and
ii. providing information about accessing mental health services on campus and in the community.

What this may look like

  • Students are advised on ways to keep mentally healthy and reduce stress, and practices that support wellbeing and good mental health are promoted in a way that students understand and respond to.
  • Students know how to, and are supported to, access the mental health services that are available on-site, in the community, online or by telephone. Consideration is given to what is important for Māori students when providing information and support to access these services.
  • Feedback from students is gathered in collaborative and culturally appropriate ways, to understand where their mental health needs may not be getting met and where they need additional support. This feedback is used to improve the information provided to students and the practices for assisting students to access the services they need.
  • Where appropriate, connections between services within the organisation and specialist and community services are developed and maintained.

Related processes

Outcome 6

Resources

Staff training to recognise and respond to health and wellbeing issues

Interim Code process: 11

Providers must have practices which assist students to be physically and mentally healthy, including –
(c) providing staff training on how to recognise and effectively respond to students who may have problems with health or wellbeing.

What this may look like

  • Staff recognise and effectively respond to students, whether in person or online, who may have problems with health or wellbeing. Staff know what help and support to give students, how to best support them, and the referral or escalation processes to follow.
  • Staff members are provided ongoing professional development or training in understanding the cultural wellbeing of Māori and Pacific students.
  • Feedback is sought from staff to ensure the training they receive is appropriate and useful and they are comfortable applying it.
  • Feedback is gathered in a collaborative way, whether in person or online, from various groups of students. Feedback seeks to understand how effectively staff are responding to students who may have problems with health or wellbeing, and is used to improve the training provided to staff.

Identifying and assisting students at risk

Interim Code process: 11

Providers must have practices which assist students to be physically and mentally healthy, including –
(d) identifying students at risk and having clear pathways for assisting those students to access appropriate health services, including mental health services on campus and in the community.

What this may look like

  • Staff are trained and know how to identify at-risk students, whether those students are learning on-site, remotely or online, on work placements, or on exchange overseas.
  • Staff understand the cultural wellbeing of Māori students where consideration is given to the learning environment so that experiences are caring, nurturing and transformative. Cultural wellbeing is fostered through tikanga that are integrated in mana enhancing ways for appropriate and relevant contexts.
  • Student support services are joined-up and there are early detection systems, clear procedures and pathways for referring students to appropriate services and helping them access those services.
  • Feedback is gathered in a collaborative way with students to understand where at-risk students are, or are not, being assisted to access the health services they need. This feedback is used to improve practices for identifying and assisting students to access the services they need.
  • Situations, communications, the measures undertaken, and the effectiveness of those measures are accurately documented and shared with relevant services in appropriate ways, including what is culturally appropriate when working within a whānau collective system that fosters mana-enhancing relationships.
  • Processes for communicating with a student, relevant staff, other agencies, the student’s parents/next-of-kin, residential caregivers or accommodation staff are clear and are in accordance with the principles of the Privacy Act.

Assisting disabled students

Interim Code process: 11

Providers must have practices which assist students to be physically and mentally healthy, including –
(e) assisting disabled students to access appropriate support where required.

What this may look like

  • Disabled students are assisted to access appropriate support where required, and reasonable accommodations are made by the provider to remove or reduce barriers. This may include access to reader/writer help in exams, note-takers in lectures and tutorials, New Zealand Sign Language interpreters, or ergonomic furniture as required.
  • Consideration is given to what is important for Māori and Pacific students when providing support and access to services.
  • Feedback is sought from disabled students to understand where their needs may not be getting met and where they need additional support. This feedback is used to improve the support given to disabled students.

Resources

  • Achieve is a national service that helps tertiary education providers meet disabled students’ needs. It includes information on Kia Ōrite, which is the New Zealand Code of Practice for an Inclusive Tertiary Education Environment for Students with Impairments.
  • Firstport provides a range of services for disabled students, including financial services, information and advice, help with equipment and transport and advice relevant to education and employment.
  • The Human Rights Commission has a guide to reasonable accommodations of persons with disabilities in New Zealand, including in tertiary education settings.
  • Whāia te Ao Mārama 2018 -22 sets out the national action plan for supporting Māori with disabilities.

Outcome 4: Progress and personal development of students

Students are assisted by providers to transition to tertiary study, progress and achieve in their studies, and to develop knowledge, skills and expertise to prepare them for further work or study.

Good practice

  • Providers understand the needs of their students in transitioning into study at their institution, and help students successfully transition to tertiary study, progress and achieve results, and develop knowledge, skills and expertise in their area of study.
  • This is evidenced through students’ progress and achievement, and feedback about their experience of transitioning to tertiary study. Particular consideration is given to Māori and Pacific students’ experiences and achievement.
  • Providers hear from their students how they might improve the support they offer students transitioning to tertiary study, and the support they offer to help students progress and achieve in their studies. Appropriate changes are implemented in a timely manner, and/or an improvement plan is developed, implemented and tracked.

Preparing for tertiary education

Interim Code process: 13

Providers must have practices for –
(a) helping students prepare for, and adjust to tertiary study, and to identify additional learning support needs early.

What this may look like

  • Relevant and accurate information is provided to students before they enrol, so they know what to expect as a tertiary student and where they can access support. A cultural perspective and awareness of the diversity of needs within groups of students is taken when considering the information students might need and how to best engage with them.
  • Partnerships with relevant groups are developed to help prepare students for tertiary education. This may include student groups, community groups, disability groups, iwi and Māori organisations, Pacific community groups and schools.
  • Students are supported to learn in their learning environment, whether that be large lectures, small classrooms, an online environment, or another learning environment. Students are helped to adjust to changes in programme delivery and transition between learning on campus, workplace learning and learning from home. Barriers to accessing their learning environment are identified and minimised.
  • Processes are in place to identify students who need additional learning support, including processes explicitly tailored to identify priority learners who need additional support and ensure culturally appropriate support is given.
  • Feedback is gathered collaboratively with students, in culturally appropriate ways, to understand where their learning support needs may not be getting met and where they need additional support in adjusting to tertiary study. This feedback is used to improve the support provided to students.

Resources

  • The School Leaver Toolkit provides advice and resources on tertiary education, moving out of home, getting a job, money and tax, and taking care of self and others.
  • Ako Aotearoa has useful resources and tools to help educators support people who are learning online.

Academic support services and oversight of achievement and engagement

Interim Code process: 13

Providers must have practices for –
(b) providing access to academic support services and maintaining appropriate oversight of student achievement and engagement.

What this may look like

  • Students have access to academic support through on-site or online academic support services, integrated learning support within the academic programme, libraries and learning resource centres, additional tutoring, proof-reading services, and access to lecturers, tutors or programme coordinators for subject-specific academic advice (during office hours or online).
  • Māori and Pacific students have equity of access to academic support through culturally appropriate and tailored support services. Barriers to accessing services are identified and minimised.
  • Students’ academic achievement and engagement is monitored, and additional support is given where needed. Processes are in place to refer students to academic support services, mentoring or peer support programmes as appropriate.
  • Feedback is gathered collaboratively with students to understand the academic support services they use and how they can be better supported. Particular consideration is given to feedback from priority learners.

Reviewing teaching and learning approaches

Interim Code processes: 13

Providers must have practices for –
(c) regularly reviewing teaching and learning approaches to respond to the needs of students.

What this may look like

Regular reviews of teaching and learning approaches take into consideration student feedback, student behaviour and student academic and graduate outcomes. Reviews identify the strengths and weaknesses of academic programmes and teaching staff, and actions for improvement are implemented in a timely manner.

Teaching and learning approaches are reviewed when the mode of delivery changes.

Teaching and learning approaches are reviewed to consider how:

  • assessment can be holistic and include appropriate approaches to assessing teaching, learning and the achievement of student outcomes
  • Mātauranga Māori can be used innovatively and creatively to support learning and understanding, where appropriate.

Student feedback is regularly sought on how teaching and learning approaches respond to their needs, with attention given to priority learners’ feedback regarding how their specific needs are being met.

Resources

Information on Te Hono o Te Kahurangi quality assurance may be of assistance.

Work-integrated learning

Interim Code process: 13

Providers must have practices for –
(d) providing opportunities for work-integrated learning.

What this may look like

  • Students participate in work-based training, on-the-job learning, internship programmes, work placements, or supervised practice hours, as appropriate.
  • Relationships and links with relevant businesses and industries are developed to facilitate work-integrated learning experiences.

Outcome 5: Inclusive learning environment

Students experience an inclusive learning environment where they are accepted and valued, respected, free from racism and discrimination, and connected with social and cultural networks.

Good practice

The learning environment, whether on-site or online, is inclusive of all students irrespective of their cultural, ethnic, religious, linguistic, socio-economic or academic background, ability or disability, gender identity, sexual orientation, or any other identity they choose to express. Students are accepted, valued, respected, free from racism and discrimination, and connected with social and cultural networks.

This is demonstrated through evidence of students’ engagement and participation in their learning community. Particular consideration is given to help the following students feel connected:

  • Māori students
  • students from various Pacific Island cultures
  • other ethnic groups
  • diverse or underrepresented groups
  • students who may be in need of additional support.

Providers know and understand the diversity of their students, listen to their students’ experiences and suggestions as to how they might improve the learning environment, and implement appropriate changes in a timely manner, and/or develop an improvement plan that is implemented and tracked.

Recognising, reducing and responding to all forms of discrimination and harassment

Interim Code process: 15

Providers must have practices for –
(a) recognising, reducing and responding to discrimination, racism, bullying, and harassment (including sexual harassment), including –
i. assisting students and staff to recognise and respond to discrimination, racism, bullying, and harassment (including sexual harassment); and
ii. reducing harm to students resulting from discrimination.

What this may look like

  • Staff receive training on how to recognise, reduce and respond to discrimination, racism, bullying and harassment, whether in person or online. They are encouraged to reflect on their own attitudes and behaviours regarding discrimination, racism, bullying and harassment.
  • Processes for reporting incidents of discrimination, racism, bullying and harassment are readily available, clear and easy to follow for students and staff. Students and staff are encouraged and supported to report incidents, whether they occur in person or online, and barriers that may hinder them reporting incidents are identified and mitigated.
  • Incidents of discrimination, racism, bullying and harassment are responded to in a timely and appropriate manner and follow up or reporting back is timely. Harm reduction interventions are put in place to reduce harm for the wider community. Post-incident support is provided to the people involved, to ensure further harm is reduced.
  • Māori and Pacific students, other ethnic groups, disabled students and students of any gender identity, sexual orientation, or any other identity, are all encouraged to contribute to establishing the policies and processes for recognising, reducing and responding to discrimination, racism, bullying and harassment. This is to ensure cultural safety and appropriateness, and address what is important for the students themselves.
  • Cultural, institutional or structural issues within the organisation, which have or may create an environment that permits discrimination, racism, bullying and harassment, are identified and corrective action is taken and managed.

Related processes

Outcome 1

Outcome 6

Resources

Inclusive environment

Interim Code process: 15

Providers must have practices for –
(b) supporting an inclusive environment.

What this may look like

  • Practices support an inclusive environment for all students of any culture, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or ability, where they are respected, included, and free to be themselves.
  • Staff receive training in inclusiveness and cultural sensitivity, including a focus on Māori and Pacific awareness and good practice.
  • Teaching and learning resources demonstrate and value diverse perspectives, experiences, and ways of learning and working. Information is provided in culturally appropriate ways and in inclusive formats.
  • Feedback is gathered collaboratively with students, in culturally appropriate ways, to understand students’ experience of how inclusive the environment is and what improvements can be made to make the environment more inclusive.

Related processes

Outcome 1

Resources

Te Kete Ipurangi has guidance about having inclusive learning environments that meet the learning and wellbeing needs of learners.

Connecting, building relationships and developing social and cultural networks

Interim Code process: 15

Providers must have practices for –
(c) providing opportunities for students to connect, build relationships and develop social and cultural networks.

What this may look like

  • Students safely interact and connect within and outside of formal learning settings. This may include through learning experiences that encourage peer-to-peer interactions and groupwork as appropriate, and forums for students to interact socially and/or online.
  • Students are encouraged and supported to establish their own cultural and shared interest groups, study groups, and social groups, and spaces or online forums are available for students to operate these in.
  • Community-based cultural, social and interest groups are promoted to students.
  • Feedback from students is used to improve the opportunities for students to connect, build relationships and develop social and cultural networks, ensuring students have the opportunities they want and need. Specific attention is given to feedback from Māori and Pacific students.

Related processes

Outcome 1

Outcome 6: Student voice

The mana of students is upheld in their learning environment and their voices are heard and integrated in decisions around the planning and provision of student support services.

Good practice

  • Students’ feedback about their learning environment, whether on-site or online, and their perspectives around the planning and provision of student support services are sought and incorporated into decisions that affect them.
  • Particular consideration is given to the experiences and perspectives of Māori students and Pacific students. Attention is also given to the experiences and perspectives of diverse or underrepresented groups and students who may require additional support.
  • Providers understand the diversity of their students, actively seek input from their students about the provision of student support services, and include students in decision making and planning.

Partnering with students

Interim Code process: 17

Providers must have practices for –
(a) assisting students to be key partners in developing practices that influence their study, their learning environment, and pastoral care.

What this may look like

  • Student representatives or leaders, including Māori and Pacific student leaders, and student establishments such as student unions, clubs and publications, are partnered with in developing and implementing practices that improve students’ experiences of their study, learning environment and pastoral care.
  • The organisation has a culture and environment where students and their voices are heard and where staff and decision makers value, genuinely consider, and incorporate students’ perspectives into their practices.

Resources

  • Te Kete Ipurangi has information and examples on how to encourage student voice.
  • The New Zealand Union of Students’ Associations has information on student voice in tertiary education.

Incorporating student perspectives

Interim Code process: 17

Providers must have practices for –
(b) having appropriate structures in place to give a platform to student perspectives, including, where appropriate, how resources and spaces are used and the content of student rules or codes of conduct.

What this may look like

  • Students’ perspectives on issues relevant to their learning environment, including the use of resources and spaces, rules and codes of conduct, are regularly sought, genuinely considered and incorporated into decisions.
  • Processes and tools to regularly gather students’ feedback are developed and implemented and an environment that empowers students to have their say and raise concerns is promoted.
  • Student establishments, such as student unions, clubs and publications, and student representatives, including Māori student representatives and Pacific student representatives, are invited to bring students’ perspectives to decisions regarding resources, spaces, rules and conduct. Where appropriate, student leaders or representatives have a seat on key decision-making bodies.

Supporting positive choices

Interim Code process: 17

Providers must have practices for –
(c) providing students with information and advice which supports positive choices impacting on wellbeing (for example, in relation to drug and alcohol use, safe sex).

What this may look like

  • Students receive information and advice that supports them to make positive choices about their wellbeing, including choices about alcohol, drugs and healthy relationships, and how they can access further help and support if required.
  • Relevant services that are available on-site, in the community, online or by telephone are made known to students. These may include services such as health services, alcohol, drug and addiction services, counselling and mental health services, and sexual health services.
  • External providers are consulted so students receive appropriate and accurate information about how to access their services. Specialist service providers, such as addiction specialists and sexual and reproductive health specialists, provide information and advice directly to students where appropriate and suitable.

Related processes

Outcome 1

Outcome 3

Resources

Addressing complaints

Interim Code process: 17

Providers must have practices for –
(d) addressing complaints by students, including providing information to students on –
i. how to use internal complaints processes; and
ii. how to make a complaint to the code administrator if a student is dissatisfied with the outcome or experience of using internal complaints processes.

What this may look like

  • Information on the internal complaints process is easily located by students on websites, noticeboards, student handbooks, or other places students go to for information, so they know how to make a complaint and what to expect.
  • This information includes how the complaint will be handled and investigated, how the privacy of individuals making, or involved in, a complaint will be maintained, and how and when students and other relevant parties will receive notification of the outcome.
  • Information on the available external complaints processes, such as making a complaint to the Code administrator, is clear and easily located by students.
  • Feedback from students on the complaints process and the information provided is applied to improve the process and quality of information supplied. Barriers to students making a complaint are identified and mitigated.
  • Support and follow up are provided after a complaint has been resolved, where appropriate.

Resources

 
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