Latin - annotated exemplars level 1 AS90867

Write short Latin sentences that demonstrate understanding of Latin (1.6)

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TKI Latin Assessment Resources

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Low Excellence

Commentary
Student response

Student 1 (PDF, 32KB)

For Excellence, the student needs to write short Latin sentences that demonstrate thorough understanding.

This involves:

  • identifying and understanding the most difficult inflections, structures and vocabulary of Latin so that the meaning and detail are consistently and correctly communicated in Latin
  • writing unambiguous sentences that are easy to understand.

The student has demonstrated thorough understanding, identifying and understanding the most difficult constructions, such as the accusative of ‘extent of time’ (1), and inflections, for example ‘mari’ (2).

The majority of the most difficult vocabulary has been identified and understood, for example ‘nec mari nec’ (3). The meaning and detail have been consistently and correctly communicated in Latin.

The sentences are unambiguous and easy to understand.

For a more secure Excellence, the student needs to correct errors of inflection. For example ‘marem’ (4) should be ‘mare’ and defessum factum sim’(5) should be ‘defessus factus sim’.

High Merit

Commentary
Student response

Student 2 (PDF, 32KB)

For Merit, the student needs to write short Latin sentences that demonstrate clear understanding.

This involves:

  • identifying and understanding the more difficult inflections, structures and vocabulary within the sentences so that the meaning and detail are consistently and correctly communicated in Latin
  • communication not being significantly hindered by inconsistencies.

The student has demonstrated clear understanding, identifying and understanding the more difficult inflections, such as ‘mare’ (1), structures, a consecutive clause (2) and vocabulary (3).  

The meaning and detail are consistently and correctly communicated in Latin, and communication is not significantly hindered by inconsistencies.

To reach Excellence, the student needs to correct errors in mood. For example, ‘possem’ (4) should be in the indicative mood: ‘poteram’.

Low Merit

Commentary
Student response

Student 3 (PDF, 32KB)

For Merit, the student needs to write short Latin sentences that demonstrate clear understanding.

This involves:

  • identifying and understanding the more difficult inflections, structures and vocabulary within the sentences so that the meaning and detail are consistently and correctly communicated in Latin
  • communication not being significantly hindered by inconsistencies.

The student has identified and understood the more difficult inflections, for example ‘ordine’ (1), constructions such as the use of the future tense in the ‘si’ clause that refers to the future (2), and vocabulary (3).

The meaning and detail are consistently and correctly communicated in Latin, and communication is not significantly hindered by inconsistencies.

To reach Merit more securely, the student needs to attend to errors in mood. For example, ‘possem’ (4) should be in the indicative mood ‘poteram’.

High Achieved

Commentary
Student response

Student 4 (PDF, 32KB)

For Achieved, the student needs to write short Latin sentences that demonstrate understanding of Latin.

This involves:

  • using linguistic knowledge to write short sentences in Latin
  • writing content that is understandable to another Latin reader, is at Curriculum Level 6, Learning Languages and contains language beyond the immediate context.

The student has used linguistic knowledge to write short Latin sentences. There is evidence of language beyond the immediate context such as perfect tense (1), and of constructions at Curriculum Level 6, Learning Languages, purpose clause (2) and ablative absolute (3).  

Despite errors in grammar and syntax the content is understandable to another Latin reader.

To reach Merit, the student needs to ensure that the more difficult inflections are correct. For example, sequiretur’(4) should be ‘sequerentur’ and castram’ (5) should be ‘castra’.

Low Achieved

Commentary
Student response

Student 5 (PDF, 32KB)

For Achieved, the student needs to needs to write short Latin sentences that demonstrate understanding of Latin.

This involves:

  • using linguistic knowledge to write short sentences in Latin
  • writing content that is understandable to another Latin reader, is at Curriculum Level 6, Learning Languages and contains language beyond the immediate context.

The student has used linguistic knowledge to write short Latin sentences. There is evidence of constructions at Curriculum Level 6, Learning Languages such as perfect tense (1) and constructions, e.g. an ablative absolute (2) and a purpose clause (3). Despite errors in grammar and syntax the content is understandable to another reader of Latin.

To reach Achieved more securely, the student needs to correct inflections and constructions. For example, ferocior’ (4) should be ferocius, and oppugnabunt’ (5) should be ‘oppugnaturos’.

High Not Achieved

Commentary
Student response

Student 6 (PDF, 32KB)

For Achieved, the student needs to needs to write short Latin sentences that demonstrate understanding of Latin.

This involves:

  • using linguistic knowledge to write short sentences in Latin
  • writing content that is understandable to another Latin reader, is at Curriculum  Level 6, Learning Languages and contains language beyond the immediate context.

The student has used linguistic knowledge to write short Latin sentences.

There is evidence of content written at Curriculum Level 6, such as a perfect deponent verb (1) and a purpose clause (2).

To reach Achieved, the student would need to ensure that content, in particular ‘acies sordida est’ (3), ‘hodie legion natans, Maori bello parant’ (4) and ‘postquam biennium speravi legionem melior cibum inventurum esse’ (5), is understandable to another reader of Latin.

 
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