Latin - annotated exemplars level 2 AS91196

Interpret studied Latin literary text(s) (2.3)

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This annotated exemplar is intended for teacher use only. The student work shown does not always represent a complete sample of what is required. Selected extracts are used, focused on the grade boundaries, in order to assist assessors to make judgements at the national standard.

Low Excellence

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 1 (PDF, 74KB)

For Excellence, the student needs to interpret, thoroughly, studied Latin literary text(s).

This involves:

  • fully expanding on selected particular points, giving evidence using Latin quotations/references supported by an English explanation from resources and/or text(s) to support answers
  • giving appropriate and unambiguous Latin evidence.

 The student has fully expanded on Virgil’s use of a rhetorical question (1) (3) (4) to depict Aeneas’ distress at losing his wife. Appropriate and unambiguous Latin evidence has been given with an English explanation (2). A quotation from the text supports the answer.

The student further expands on the use of the rhetorical question by commenting on the cruelty of fate (5).

For a more secure Excellence, the student could expand on the idea of fate (5) by supplying other instances of Aeneas’ life being controlled by the divine. For example, the student could relate the way in which Aeneas was visited by the ghost of Hector and told to leave Troy. 

High Merit

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 2 (PDF, 49KB)

For Merit, the student needs to interpret, clearly, studied Latin literary text(s).

This involves selecting particular points and expanding on them unambiguously in English.

The student has selected Virgil’s use of a simile (1) to convey Aeneas’ frustration at being unable to grasp the ghost of his wife. This point is expanded by showing parallels between the simile and Aeneas’ past (2).

Further expansion is provided by reference to Aeneas’ new and inescapable task (3).The effect of the simile on the reader is described (4) (5).

To reach Excellence, the student could provide a Latin quotation with an English explanation for the identified simile (1) to support the answer. For example, ‘ter frustra comprensa manus effugit imago, par levibus ventis volucrique simillima somno’ could be translated as ‘Three times that wraith escaped the vain clasp of my hands like airy winds or the melting of a dream’.

Low Merit

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 3 (PDF, 73KB)

For Merit, the student needs to interpret, clearly, studied Latin literary text(s).

This involves selecting particular points and expanding on them unambiguously in English.

The student has selected the particular points of the similarity between the fall of Troy and the fall of an ancient mountain ash (1) in that both crash ‘to the ground in a wreck’ (4).

The first point has been expanded by describing the farmers’ weapons, iron and axes (1), with which they hack at the tree. The process is described as long and drawn out (2) (3). In addition, the student points out that the ash was also like the city of Troy, in that both were ancient and high up (5).

For a more secure Merit, the student could complete the quote (5) by adding in montibus. The student could expand more overtly on points of similarity between Troy and the tree, for example that the attack on Troy was also long and drawn out, with frequent attacks (2) (3).

High Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 4 (PDF, 69KB)

For Achieved, the student needs to interpret studied Latin literary text(s).

This involves:

  • using linguistic and cultural knowledge to establish meaning or significance of the Latin text(s)
  • extracting and discussing information and ideas contained in the Latin text(s), such as textual features, theme, content, figurative language, symbolism, atmosphere, characterisation and scansion.

The student has used linguistic and cultural knowledge to extract the meaning or significance of the Latin text (1) (2). An example of anaphora has been extracted (2), and the effect of its use is discussed (3) (4).

To reach Merit, the student could expand on Aeneas’ old life being over (4) by discussing his past life and explaining what awaits him in the future.

Low Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 5 (PDF, 68KB)

For Achieved, the student needs to interpret studied Latin literary text(s).

This involves:

  • using linguistic and cultural knowledge to establish meaning or significance of the Latin text(s)
  • extracting and discussing information and ideas contained in the Latin text(s), such as textual features, theme, content, figurative language, symbolism, atmosphere, characterisation and scansion.

The student has used linguistic and cultural knowledge to establish aspects of the meaning and significance of the Latin text (4). An example of figurative language, alliteration, has been extracted (1). The student has discussed the fact that Latin poetry was read aloud (2) and the repeated sound would have an impact on the audience.

For a more secure Achieved, the student could expand on the link between the sound of the alliteration of d’ and the fact that Aeneas is climbing down (3). For example, the repeated ‘d’ could represent the sound of Aeneas’ footsteps.

High Not Achieved

Commentary
Student work extract

Student 6 (PDF, 68KB)

For Achieved, the student needs to interpret studied Latin literary text(s).

This involves:

  • using linguistic and cultural knowledge to establish meaning or significance of the Latin text(s)
  • extracting and discussing information and ideas contained in the Latin text(s), such as textual features, theme, content, figurative language, symbolism, atmosphere, characterisation and scansion.

The student has begun to use linguistic and cultural knowledge to establish the meaning and significance of the text (3). The definition of chiasmus has been given and an example of its use extracted (2).

To reach Achieved, the student could translate the extract (1) into English. With reference to that translation, the significance of Virgil’s using chiasmus to put the focus on montis (3) could be explained.

 
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