Visual Arts - annotated exemplars level 1 AS90913

Demonstrate understanding of artworks from a Māori and another cultural context using art terminology (1.1)

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TKI Visual Arts Assessment Resources

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Low Excellence

Commentary
Student response

Student 1 (PDF, 136KB)

For Excellence students need to demonstrate comprehensive understanding of art works from a Māori and another cultural context. This involves identifying particular information through the analysis of artworks in the student’s own words using art terminology. 

Evidence needs to:

  • explain specific methods used to communicate ideas
  • explain the cause/effect of relationships between art works and their contexts. 

This student demonstrates comprehensive understanding because they explain how specific methods are used to communicate particular ideas. For example, in Aramoana by Ralph Hotere (1), a clear connection is made between the expressive technique and the meaning of the work.

The last part of the Hotere discussion establishes an explicit relationship between artwork and context with the statement about the environmental activism intention of the work (2). The student demonstrates comprehensive understanding in the reference to the relationship between traditional and contemporary practices in the work of Peter Robinson (3).

A political purpose is identified for each painting. This makes a connection between the art works which enhances the comprehensive nature of the understanding.

For a more secure Excellence, the student would need to further explain the more isolated pieces of information to show how specific methods are used to communicate ideas.  For example the reference to the ‘grid structure’ by Peter Robinson (4) should explain the significance of this feature.

The Rachel Buchanan quote (5) would also need to be more explicitly linked to the discussion of methods and ideas that precede and follow it.

High Merit

Commentary
Student response

Student 2 (PDF, 70KB)

For Merit students need to demonstrate in-depth understanding of art works from a Māori and another cultural context. This involves identifying particular information and explaining this in the student’s own words using art terminology. 

Evidence needs to:

  • move beyond descriptions of art works to identify the relationships between methods and ideas
  • identify the cause/effect of relationships between art works and their contexts.

This student demonstrates in-depth understanding at the higher end of the Merit grade range, because the explanation identifies clear relationships between the methods and ideas of artists in particular art works. For example the size of the letters indicates the relative importance of people and places in the Urewera Mural (2).

A depth of understanding occurs where the explanations are supported with information from research sources, for example the quote from  the Tūhoe activist (1), which illustrates a specific Māori response to the work. The Hine-Titama response includes biographical (5), narrative (6), and critical (4) research.

The student includes some comments that approach the level of comprehensive understanding needed for Excellence, such as the reference to a European artist producing an art work with Māori content (3). This establishes the relationship between artist, art work, and cultural context.

For Excellence, the student would need to further explain relationships between methods, ideas and cultural contexts. For example, the composition section for Hine-Titama describes the layout of the image, but also needs to explain how this relates to the narrative, stylistic influences, or cultural context.

Low Merit

Commentary
Student response

Student 3 (PDF, 89KB)

For Merit students need to demonstrate in-depth understanding of art works from a Māori and another cultural context. This involves identifying particular information and explaining this in the student’s own words using art terminology. 

Evidence needs to:

  • move beyond descriptions of art works to identify the relationships between methods and ideas
  • identify the cause/effect of relationships between art works and their contexts.

This student demonstrates in-depth understanding because they explain how the stylistic qualities contribute to the meaning of the work. For example, ‘All watery like raining’ (4) relates to the damp atmosphere of the image. The clear link between the colour of Episode 0022 and that of comic book art (1) identifies a cause/effect relationship.

The last part of the Fall of Icarus analysis states that the actions of Walter Buller are a moral concern for Hammond (5). This direct link between research information and the painting demonstrates the in-depth understanding needed for Merit evidence.

For a more secure Merit the student would need to make more consistent connections between methods, ideas and contexts. For example, while a connection between the scale of the work and aspirations of the Taratoa (3) demonstrate understanding, a fuller response would explain how the public responded to the work.

The student would also need to make more selective use of research information. For example the extended quote in the ‘meaning’ section of Episode 0022 (2) could be shortened to relate more directly to the ideas expressed in the last two sentences.

High Achieved

Commentary
Student response

Student 4 (PDF, 127KB)

For Achieved, students need to demonstrate understanding of art works from a Māori and another cultural context by identifying and describing works in the student’s own words using art terminology.

This student demonstrates understanding at the higher end of the Achieved grade range. For example, in the techniques’ section for Nigel Brown (3), the student has identified a clear connection between the artist’s stylistic features and his personal life. This cause/effect discussion is approaching the in-depth understanding required for Merit.

Evidence of reading from appropriate sources is present in the Nga Reo, Kuia response, which includes a quote from an Art New Zealand article to support the explanation of Kahukiwa’s feminist intentions (2). This shows consideration of the wider cultural context. This information shows that the understanding is informed by appropriate research, since the feminist content is not immediately apparent by simply looking at the image. 

For Nga Reo, Kuia the student links the dull earthy colours with the subject’s connection to the earth (1). This connection between specific methods and ideas places the extract at the high end of Achieved grade range.

For Merit, the student would need to present more sustained in-depth explanations that move beyond identifying and describing responses. For example, the composition’ section of Janet Frame by Nigel Brown (4) might explain how and why Brown used the identified pictorial devices. The quotes included in the ‘meaning’ section of the Janet Frame evidence would need to be connected to the specific methods and ideas of the painting.

Low Achieved

Commentary
Student response

Student 5 (PDF, 171KB)

For Achieved, students need to demonstrate understanding of art works from a Māori and another cultural context by identifying and describing works in the student’s own words using art terminology.

This student demonstrates understanding because the extract describes the technical and visual features from the Māori context (Cotton, Adsett) and another cultural context (Binney, Hammond).

The student uses appropriate art terminology. For example in the Don Binney analysis the student correctly distinguishes between the naturalism of the hills and stylisation of the bird (2). The student identifies some thematic ideas in particular works such as the environmental purpose of Binney (3) and political content of Cotton (4).

For a more secure Achieved, the student would need to provide more sustained explanations of how the cultural contexts have influenced the methods and ideas of the artists.  For example the student should explain how Cotton integrates European materials and techniques with Māori narratives and beliefs. 

The thematic ideas (3) need to be explained in greater depth and include clear explanations of how specific methods have been used to communicate particular ideas. The student could also include quotes from appropriate sources to support points such as the shrunken head discussion (4) for Kikorangi.

Where biographical information is included, as in the Binney analysis (1), it should be directly linked to the methods and ideas of the painting rather than simply included without reference to the art work.

High Not Achieved

Commentary
Student response

Student 6 (PDF, 164KB)

For Achieved students need to demonstrate understanding of art works from a Māori and another cultural context by identifying and describing works in the student’s own words using art terminology.

This student is close to demonstrating sufficient understanding because they include some appropriate information using art terminology. For example, in the ‘form’ section for Don Binney (1), the words ‘simplified’ and ‘naturalistic’ are used correctly. The student also demonstrates understanding by identifying some thematic content and communicative intentions in the ‘meaning’ sections for both Binney (2) and Cotton (5). 

While the student’s use of spelling and grammar is often inconsistent, the meaning of each statement is still sufficiently clear.

For Achieved, the student would need to move beyond the short answers provided in some sections (4), to create more complete descriptions using appropriate art terminology. They should also provide descriptions and explanations using their own words, rather than cut and paste text from the internet (3).

The student would also need to focus on identifying and describing methods and ideas, rather than stating personal opinions (6). Including the title and date of each work (omitted by this student) would help meet the identification requirements of the standard.

 
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